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SPRING 2008 




L A S E L L 



c o 



Where the Classroom 
Is The Real World 



n this issue 


2 


Message from the President 


3 


Inauguration 


6 


Connected Learning 


13 


Class Notes' 


19 


Campus Update 


26 


Alumni Relations 


29 


Annual Fund 


30 


Major Gifts 


31 


Sports 



Commencement Speaker 
Retailing and Merchandising Expert 
Trudy F. Sullivan, President and CEO 
of The Talbots, Inc. 



Trudy F. Sullivan, 
who became 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer of 
The Talbots, Inc. on 
August 5, 2007, w^ill 
be the commencement 
speaker and an 
honorary degree 
recipient at Lasell College's T54th graduation 
ceremonies Sunday, May 18, 2008. Ms. Sullivan 
oversees all aspects of business for The 
Talbots, including strategic direction and 
initiatives for The Talbots and 1. lill brands. 




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Michael B. Alexander is Installed as 
Ninth President of Lasell College 



IVlichael B. Alexander was installed as 
the ninth President of Lasell College on 
Friday, April 4, 2008. The installation 
ceremony was part of a celebratory 
three-day series of events designed 
around the theme "Embracing 
Diversity." In addition to honoring 
Lasell s new president and affording 
him an opportunity to share his 
vision for the College, the inauguration 
also gave the entire Lasell College 
community the chance to celebrate 
the institution's unique history, 
reaffirm its mission, and showcase 
its accomplishments as a leader in 
innovative education since 1851. 



In his inauguration speech. President 
Alexander invoked the memory of 
Dr. Martin Luther BCing, on the 40th 
anniversary of his assassination. 
He talked about the need to face a 
daunting and uncertain future without 
fear saying, "Lasell's challenge today 
is to build upon the foundation created 
by the stewards of the past, to raise 
the College's prominence to a level 
commensurate with its recent 
achievements and those about to 
come. Through the power of education, 
we can do our part to make the world 
right for our children." To view the 
speech in its entirety, go to 
www.lasell.edu/inauguration.asp '« 




President Alexander waves after the 
installation ceremony. 



Inauguration higinlights on page 3 



Faculty Chair in the Arts Established 

Lasell Receives $1 Million from 
Diane Heath Beever '49 Trust 



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Diane Heath Beever '4<) 



Through the 
generosity of the 
Diane Heath 
Beever '49 Trust, 
Lasell is 
establishing a 
new faculty chair 
in the arts. The 



College is deeply grateful for the gift of 



$1 million which will allow Lasell to 
expand and promote the development 
of the arts both within and beyond 
the curriculum. 

Diane Beever was one of 13 members 
of the Heath family to attend Lasell. 
She had a special love for the College 
and a passion for the arts. The gift. 



established in her memory, will 
enhance the fine and visual arts 
offerings at Lasell. 

"What a wonderful way to remember 
Diane and to keep her legacy alive on 
campus," said Dean for Institutional 
Advancement Ruth Shuman. 



New Student 
Residences to 
be Built 

Construction on two new Woodland 
Road residence halls will begin in June 
and students are scheduled to move in 
by September 2009. The interior 
design of the buildings will be similar 
to Rockwell Hall, which opened last 
fall. Together the new buildings will 
house 132 students with parking 
facilities located underground. The 
new complex will be outfitted with 
wireless capabilities. « 




The new Woodland Road residences will be situated in front of Van Winkle and McClelland 
Halls, creating a courtyard. Pathways will lead from building to building, enhancing the 
sense of community. 



Message from the President 




Michael B. Alexander. 

Dear Members of the Lasell Family, 

These are exciting times at Lasell. In 
November, the Board of Trustees 
approved a Strategic Plan, developed by 
representatives from every branch of the 
Lasell family tree, that articiilates a 
vision for the future of Lasell over the 
next five years. The plan focuses on 
what will be new and different at Lasell 



by the fall of the year 2012. 1 don't 
want to discuss the plan in detail 
here because it is covered in an article 
elsewhere in this issue of Leaves 
(see p. 21). I do want to discuss what 
is new and different — new programs, 
new people, and new things. 

As the College continues to grow, the 
faculty must grow with it. We have in 
progress 14 faculty searches for next 
year, 13 of which are for new positions. 
One of these faculty members will be 
part of our new major in Environmental 
Studies. Several of these hires are in 
anticipation of new graduate programs 
that will come into being over the next 
, four years. To achieve our goal of two- 
thirds of all courses being taught by 
full-time faculty, we believe we need to 
create 40-50 additional positions over 
the next five years. We had a boost in 
reaching this goal when we received a 
$1 million endowment gift funding the 
Diane Heath Beever '49 Professorship 
in the Arts. 

At the January Board meeting, the 
Trustees approved the construction of 
two new residence halls on Woodland 



Road between Forest and Studio Roads. 
The placement of these new buildings 
will form a courtyard with McClelland 
and Van Winkle Halls that will create a 
beautiful and useable public space on 
campus and make the existing 
buildings more attractive. The new 
residence halls will be ready for 
occupancy for the fall semester 2009. 



^ I 



We have started design and approval 
work on the renovation of two older 
buildings — a house and a barn — 
adjacent to the Yamawaki Art and 
Cultural Center that will provide new 
studio space for fashion, art and music 
courses, a couple of additional 
classrooms, display and storage space, 
particularly for our fashion collection, 
and facility offices. This exciting project 
will also help to complete the definition 
of the Campus Center Quad on the 
west side of campus. The timing of 
construction for this project is 
dependent on receiving required 
approvals from the City of Newton. 

Other things new include the baseball 
team, a cheerleading squad, a track and 
field club, a new service learning 



program in Nicaragua, expanded hours 
in the library and food service, and, 
yes, the President. 

The Inauguration was an exciting 
weekend for me and for the College, 
with cultural performances on the 
evening of April 3, academic colloquia 
and the investiture on April 4, and 
the culminating Inaugural Scholarship 
Gala on the evening of April 5. I was 
pleased to have so many come and 
celebrate and help raise money to 
support scholarships for students 
with financial need. 

Best wishes to you and your families. 

Sincerely, 




Michael B. Alexander 
President 



New Trustees, Overseers, and Corporators Elected 

Lasell College is Pleased to Announce the Election of 
New Board Members 




Board of Trustees 

Richard K. 
Blankstein is a 
founding partner 
of the Boston 
law firm of 
Postemak 
Blankstein & 
Lund, LLP. 
He has lectured on legal topics 
relating to real estate development, 
environmental law, commercial 
leasing, software licensing, 
transitioning ownership in family- 
owned and closely held businesses, 
and multi-jurisdictional practice. 

Mr. Blankstein is a Phi Beta Kappa 
graduate of the University of 
Wisconsin and graduated from 
Harvard Law School cum laude. He 
has had experience on a wide variety 
of non-profit boards. He is currently a 
member of the board of the National 
Human Services Assembly and the 
National Chamber of Commerce's 
Space Enterprise Council. He is also a 
member of the Governing Council of 
the American Hospital Association 
Section for Long-Term Care and 
Rehabilitation and is Chairman of the 
Board of New England Sinai Hospital. 




Helena Bentz 
Hartnett joined the 
Lasell senior staff 
in July 1989 and 
later became Dean 
for External 
Affairs. During her 
eight-year tenure, 
she developed a fundraising 
infrastructure at the College and was 
instrumental in raising substantial 
amounts for the institution. In 1998, 
she was awarded the Lasell Medallion 
to honor her accomplishments. 

Ms. Hartnett left: Lasell to accept the 
position of Director of Development for 
the New Bedford Whaling Museum in 
New Bedford, MA and was part of the 
expansion and transformation of the 
institution. In January 2006, she 
became Director of Development and 
External Relations at the Isabella Stewart 
Gardner Museum, which is currently 
raising money for its first major 
expansion since opening its doors in 
1903. Ms. Hartnett has served on Lasell's 
Board of Overseers since 1999 and 
became the Vice Chair of the Board in 
June 2004. 




Since the early 
1990s, Eric M. 
Turner has offered 
his commitment, 
counsel and 
financial support 
to Lasell. He has 
served alternately as a trustee and an 
overseer and, this November, he was 
elected Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees. In 2006, as chair of Lasell's 
Presidential Search Committee, he lent 
his insight and leadership abilities to 
the selection process. 

Mr. Turner is a management 
consultant specializing in issues of 
interest to general managers. He was a 
Senior Vice President at State Stieet 
Corporation and prior to that was 
employed as Executive Director of the 
Massachusetts State Lottery and 
Deputy Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
He is on the board of Scientific 
Games Corporation. 




Board of Overseers 

Patti Beck Bishop 

'97 has freely 
given her time to 
the College. Soon 
afi:er graduation 
she joined the 
Alumni Board 
of Management 
where she was offered the Vice 
Presidency in 2001 and the Presidency 
in 2003. She served tirelessly in that 
position until 2007. Under her 
leadership, the Board was revitalized, 
with new members recruited and 
changes made to the by-laws. She is the 
Supervisor of the Call Center at Want 
Ad Pubhcations. 

Carol C. Cacciamani '65 became 
reconnected with Lasell because she 
was impressed with the College's 
dynamic growth and direction. She 
joined the Board of Trustees in 1993 
and in 1998 she became its chairman, 
a position she held until 2002. During 
her time of leadership Winslow Hall 
was converted into a modern high-tech 
center and the successful Lasell 150 
Campaign was completed. 

continued on page 3 



2 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Inauguration 



A Celebration of the Arts 



The Academic Colloquium 



On Thursday, April 3, the Yamawaki 
Cultural Center was the site of a tribute 
to Japanese culture and a performance 
of the Japanese Tea Ceremony to honor 
Lasell's long-standing relationship with 
the Yamawaki Gakuen Junior College 
in Tokyo. William Soei Thrasher, a 
specialist in contemporary Japanese 
art and craft and adjunct professor of 
art at the Rhode Island School of 
Design and the Art Institute of Boston, 
guided visitors through the Japanese 
Tea Ceremony. 



Among other participating artists 
were Elizabeth Mitsuye Horwitz 
who exhibited her unique washi paper 
creations and other artwork in the 
Wedeman Art Gallery, flautist Orlando 
Cela, music director of the Willow 
Flute Ensemble, and the Yamawaki 
Chamber Orchestra, who performed 
with Ayaikano Cathleen Read who 
played the koto, a traditional Japanese 
stringed instrument. « 




On Friday, April 4, presentations were 
made by both faculty and students. 
There were two "Student Voices" panels. 
The first was facilitated by Psychology 
Professor Marsha Mirkin and was titled 
"The Immigrant Student Experience." 
The second panel focused on race and 
an individual's responsibility for 
addressing racism and social inequality. 

Students discussed two new College 
initiatives. "Companeros de 
Conversacion" is a community service- 
learning project that pairs students with 
LaseU's Spanish-speaking workers for 
the purpose of building the workers' 
English conversational skills. 

At "Genocide: Darfur Awareness and 
Action" four education students 



discussed the challenges and satisfactions 
of developing their own course on an 
urgent international crisis. They 
described their effort from its origins in 
an Honors component to its culmination 
in a campus-wide Darfur Day of Action. 

There was also a program on 
international perspectives that 
highlighted several college programs. 
Students who participated in the 
College's annual January "Shoulder to 
Shoulder" program in Mexico described 
their experiences. Other students 
discussed the "Microlending in Third 
World Countries" project for which 
they had selected and researched 
entrepreneurs in third world countries. '«' 




At the Japanese Tea Ceremony, President and Mrs. Alexander accept the tea from Professor 
William Soei Thrasher. 



Kathy Montrevil '08 addresses the audience at the Immigrant Experience "Student 
Voices" panel. 



New Board Members Elected 

continued from page 2 

Carol joined State Street Corporation 
immediately after graduating from 
Lasell and served the institution for 32 
years. She held a variety of positions 
including senior management 
responsibilities in branch banking, 
training and development, and 
commercial lending. She retired as 
Senior Vice President and Director of 
Corporate Administration. 

Joan Howe 
Weber '51 has 
long worked hard 
on behalf of 

Lasell. She 
became an 
overseer in 1996 
and a trustee the 
following year In 2001, she donned 
many hats, serving as the vice chair of 
the Board, co-chair of the Lasell 150 
Campaign and was one of the class 
agents for her 50th Reunion. Her 
tireless energy and support of the 




College was recognized that year when 
she was presented with the Lasell 
Medallion. 

In August of 2001, Joan and 20 
members of her family were present at 
the dedication of the Winslow Academic 
Center's Weber Computer Lab, a legacy 
that has been used by countless faculty 
members and students. In addition to 
her Lasell volunteer work, she is a civic 
leader in her community of Lexington, 
KY where she is active on the Board of 
the St. Joseph's Hospital Foundation. 




Corporators 

Kathy Morgan 
Lucey '67 

discovered her 
love of teaching in 
high school and 
applied to Lasell 
because it offered 
an excellent program in the field. 
This was the beginning of her fond 
attachment to the College and the 
classes she took formed the basis of her 
life's career. In September 1989, she 
came to work at the Holway Child 
Study Center at Rockwell and has been 
there for 21 years. Kathy has served on 
the Alumni Board of Management 
since 1973 and has always been a 
dedicated Lasell volunteer. In 
recognition of all her contributions 
to the College, she was presented with 
the Lasell Medallion in 1992. 




Ann J. Mignosa 

'87 is an active 
member of both 
the Lasell College 
and Village 
communities. She 
has served on the 
Alumni Board of Management for 15 
years and was a member of the 
College's Strategic Planning Committee 
in 2003-2004. She was also a member 
of the Presidenfs Search Committee. 
At the Village, she has been Vice-Chair 
and Chair of the Advisory Council and 
was Chair of the Finance Committee. 

Ann has shared her expertise by 
tutoring Accounting and Math at the 
College's Learning Center as well as 
teaching computer classes at the 
Village and at the Newton Senior 
Center. She herself is an avid student 
who takes courses at both the College 
and the Village and, in 2005, she 
accompanied 10 Lasell students on the 
service-learning trip to Mexico as the 
official photographer *' 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 3 



Inauguration 



The Installation Ceremony 



The Inaugural Scholarship Gala 



On Friday, the installation ceremony 
with its traditions and regalia was the 
heart of the inaugural celebration. 
There were 43 robed representatives 
from local, regional and national 
academic institutions, including 
Brandeis, Harvard, Brown, and 
Williams. The installation included, 
for the first time in Lasell's history, 
the introduction of tlie Lasell 
ceremonial mace and presidential 
chain of office and medallion. The 
two were unveiled at the installation 
ceremony and will be part of every 
future Lasell academic celebration. W 




Vice President for Academic Affairs Jim 
Ostrow carries the mace. 




The Gala was held at the Riverside 
Center and in keeping with the theme 
of "Embracing Diversity," the evening 
featured dining on culinary delights 
from different countries of the world. 



The announcement was made that 
thanks to the generous donations from 
alumni, parents and friends of the 
College, over $20,000 was raised for 
Lasell's scholarship fund. '*' 





(L to R) It was a family affair: daughter 
Ma^e Alexander, mother Polly Alexander 
and sister Lesley Gady. 



The Alexanders enjoy themselves at 
the Gala. 




(L to R) Chairman of the Board of Trustees Eric Turner, President Alexander, Newton 
Mayor David Cohen and Tufts University President Lawrence Bacow gather before the 
Installation Ceremony. 



President Alexander and Adelaide Van Winkle with the scholarship find check. 





Adelaide Shaffer Van Winkle ']6/H'g6 places the medallion around President Alexander's 
neck as Chairman Turner looks on. 



Dancing to the music at the end of the evening. 



Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Connected Learning 



I 



"Hats from the Heart" 

Accessories Design Students Stitch to Keep Children Warm 



It's been a snowy and cold winter but 
thanks to the talent and efforts of 
Fashion Professor Lynn Blake's 
Accessories Design class the heads of 
many homeless children have been kept 
warm. The students all participated in a 
community service project called "Hats 
from the Heart" that examined the 
social responsibility of their art while 
helping those in need. 

"In the fashion world a misguided 
importance is placed on cultivating a 
culturally acceptable appearance and the 
reality of clothing as an item of basic 
survival becomes watered down," says 
Professor Blake. "This project aims to 
move design focus from desire to 
functionality — to focus on the need for 
children to simply and deservedly keep 
and stay warm." 



Students were provided with warm 
fleece and a pattern for a reversible 
child's hat in sizes from infant to seven 
years old. The results were not only 
practical, they were fun, with rabbif s 
ears, tails, and funny faces. 

The finished hats were given to "Cradles 
to Crayons," a non-profit organization 
that provides basic essentials to low- 
income and homeless children and 
partners wdth social service agencies for 
distribution. "The great thing about the 
project was that our results were so 
tangible," says Lisa Jesse '08. "A 
horrifying statistic is that the average 
age of a homeless person in the United 
States is eight years old and it is so nice 
to think that we were able to help in 
some small way." « 




(L to R) Fashion students Vivienne Lowe 'og, Lisa Jesse '08, Salvatore Gianni III '08, and 
Christine Famell 'og critique the finished hats. 



Contest for Inauguration Gown 

Mary Barbara Alexander Picks Student Design for Gala 




Theresa Lomhardi 'og's winning sketch. 

The beautiful flowing lavender evening 
dress that Mary Barbara Alexander wore 
to her husband's Inauguration Gala was 
created especially for her by Theresa 
Lombard! '09 as a result of a unique 
connected learning contest. "It occurred 
to me that designing my dress would be 
a wonderful opportunity for the Lasell 
Fashion Design students to test their 



creativity and for the winner to have 
the experience of taking a dress from 
concept to completion, with her piece 
being seen by all at the Gala," says 
Mary Barbara. 

There was immediate excitement when 
Mary Barbara approached Fashion 
Professor Maritza Farrell with the idea. 
"I knew it would be fiin and, more 
importantly, it was a great chance for 
the students to test their design abilities 
while working within guidelines that 
have been set by a client," says Professor 
Farrell. "I talked with Fashion Professor 
Joan Morris and we decided to open 
the contest up to the juniors in her 
Technical Pattern Drafting II class." 

Mary Barbara met with the juniors and 
explained what she was looking for in 
the dress. "I told them what colors 
worked for my skin tone, what designers 
I like, that I was looking for a flowing 
fabric, and it needed to be a dress that 
I could dance in," she recalls. "Students 
asked me questions and one wondered 
if I wanted the design to be conservative 
or glamorous. 'Glamorous,' I said, 'I'm 
an actress!'" 

Eleven students entered the contest 
and Mary Barbara picked Theresa's 
design. "My daughter said, 'This one 
looks like you,"' when she saw it," 
recalls Mary Barbara. "It's Ralph 
Lauren meets Valentino." 



Mary Barbara has been sewing since 
she was eleven and while in New York 
she picked out the silk chiffon and silk 
charmeuse fabric for the gown. "The 
colors change when you layer them 
differentiy," says Professor Farrell, who 
worked with Theresa as she constructed 
the dress. "We needed to see which 
arrangement of the fabrics would 
bring us closest to the color in 
Theresa's sketch." 



With Professor Farrell's guidance, 
Theresa worked many hours making 
the dress. "I had four pages of notes 
on how to sew the dress," says 
Theresa. "I couldn't believe it when 
my gown was chosen and even 
though the sketch is now a reality it 
still hasn't really sunk in." Mary 
Barbara will be modeling the dress in 
the Spring Fashion Show and again 
over Reunion Weekend, e 




(L to R) Professor Maritza Farrell, Professor Joan Morris, Theresa Lomhardi 'og and Mary 
Barbara Alexander discuss the best way to layer the gown's fabric. 




Lasell Leaves Q 






Connected Learning 



"And Still We Rise" 

Former Prisoners Bring Powerful Performance to Lasell 



Students and faculty filled de Witt Hall 
for a performance by former prisoners 
that was sponsored by the Donahue 
Institute and Criminal Justice Honors 
students. The strains of Marvin Gaye's 
"What's Going On?" quieted the hum of 
conversation and audience members 
were surprised when their neighbors 
rose from their seats and went on stage. 
This is the first lesson of "And Still We 
Rise" — former prisoners look like 
anybody else. Ninety-seven percent of 
incarcerated men and women return to 
the community and interact with an 
imkno\\ing public every day. The 
stereot>'pe must be wTong. 

"And Still We Rise" is a collaboration 
of theatre artists and social justice 
advocates who work together wdth ex- 
prisoners and their loved ones to bring 
a powerful, articulate, personal voice of 
prison experience to the public for the 
purpose of healing, education, 
empowerment, and social change. 

It began at City Mission in Boston as a 
therapeutic means of self-expression. 



"It was a way to get former prisoners 
to talk about themselves and get them 
out of their shells," says Sociology 
Professor Jenifer Drew, who was 
instrumental in bringing the program 
to Lasell. "Their stories are very 
powerful and they started performing 
pieces that discussed their growing up, 
imprisonment, survival, and re-entry." 

"Prison is not there to reform you," 
said an actor. "It warehouses you. You 
have to refuse to lose and take yourself 
out of the vicious revolving door cycle 
that happens to many prisoners." 

"You have to learn to love yourself" 
explained another former prisoner. 
"I was mentally incarcerated and I 
found that when you get self-respect, 
everyone will respect you. You can 
grow if you choose to. When you have 
a lot of time to talk to cockroaches and 
ants you get to know yourself I had 
to dig deep into my faith and be 
determined never to say 'no.' I started 
working in the law library and read 20 



— 30 books a month. I worked out, 
stayed healthy and thought healthy." 

The troupe is used to performing in 
places where the audience is involved in 
the prison reform movement. Lasell was 
a challenge for them because there was 
a need to persuade. A "talk-back" was 
held at the end of the performance and 
students' questions prompted a lively 
debate about the purposes of 
incarceration and the need for 
rehabilitative services in prison. 

"Our job is to educate the audience," 
said an actor. "Once people come to an 
understanding that rehabilitation makes 
prisoners take responsibility for what 
they've done, the hope is that the 
audience's feeUngs will be ameliorated. 
Talking at Lasell stiffened our spine and 
I hope we opened doors because when 
you change your heart it feels so good." '« 



Poetry and Jazz Reverberate in de Witt 

Nationally Known Artists Magdalena Gomez and 
Fred Ho Perform 



Poetry and music are brute 

necessities, not luxuries," said poet, 
playwright, and arts educator 
Magdalena Gomez as she introduced 
the spellbinding performance that was 
about to follow. In a program titled 
"Caliente!! Circle round the Sun: 
Revolutions in Poetry and Jazz," she 
and baritone saxophone player Fred Ho 
filled de Witt Hall with the cadence of 
word and music. The event was 
sponsored by the Office of Student 
Activities, the Donahue Institute 
for Values and Pubic Life, and the 
Honors Program. 




(L to R) Fred Ho and Magdalena Gomez 
deliver a powerful performance. 



Ms. Gomez began her multidisciplinary 
arts career as a performance poet and 
cultural worker. Her early plays and 
poems were performed in prisons, 
hospitals, conferences, and multi- 
denominational houses of worship. 
She has used the arts as a means of 
inspiring leadership and civic 
engagement. Now living in 
Springfield, MA , she has founded a 
theater-education-social action 
collaboration, Teatro Vida, which 
embraces respect and the celebration 
of diversity at its core. 

Fred Ho is the leader and founder of the 
Afro-Asian Jazz Ensemble and many of 
his works fuse the melodies from the 
indigenous and traditional musics of 
these two cultures. He has won 
prestigious recognition including from 
the McKnight Foundation, the 
Rockefeller Foundation, and the 
National Endowment for the Arts. 

The program began with Ms. Gomez 
delivering a powerful reading of several 
of her poems. Her words reverberated, 
delivering a message that although at 



times humorous, carried a cutting 
political or social message. "Mine is a 
journalistic poetry," she said. "My eyes 
are always awake and when I see 
something, I take a note." 

Using the deep sounds of the baritone 
sax, Fred Ho played three pieces that 
told the stories of early Japanese, 
Chinese, and Filipino immigrants. In 
his journey as an Asian- American artist, 
he has delved deeply into the history of 
each of these populations. His study of 
Japanese folk songs was the inspiration 
for his first number. "Old fishing songs 
became songs for the Japanese who 
arrived in Hawaii to work on the sugar 
plantations. They were sung exclusively 
by women and the earthiness comes 
from the hardship they endured," 
he explained. 

At the conclusion of the program, 
the two artists performed together with 
Fred Ho improvising to the rhythms 
of Ms. Gomez's poems. It was unique 
and inspiring. *' 




Support and Advocacy 
for Prisoners 

Marian Salama 
'08 Interns at 
Partakers 



I he goal 
of Partakers is 
to assist in 
the healing 
transformation 
of prisoners," 
explains Legal 
Studies major Marian Salama '08 
who did her fall internship at the 
Auburndale, MA non-profit 
organization and who is continuing 
her work there this semester as a 
directed study. "We train volunteers 
to be mentors to support the 
inmates who are in the Boston 
University Prison Education 
Program. A bachelor's degree 
means so much to the prisoners 
and being part of helping them 
regain their self-respect is intense 
and meaningful." 

Partakers takes great care in pairing 
up the volunteers and the prisoners. 
"We read the files of both parties," 
explains Marian "and each inmate 
has a team of four to six volunteers 
from congregations throughout 
Greater Boston that works with him 
or her. We want to make as good a 
fit as we can. The volunteers are the 
inmate's contact with the outside 
world and there needs to be a 
feeling of trust." 

During her internship Marian 
assisted with the volunteers' 
orientation. "We go over how to 
dress and act and discuss situations 
that might come up," she explains. 
"After the initial meeting we have a 
follow-up session to recap what 
happened. Sometimes former 
prisoners will come and give 
suggestions for changes. From 
listening to them, it is apparent 
how much their education means. 

"Incarcerated men and women are 
often in prison because of poverty 
and a lack of education. The outside 
world can seem a long way off. 
Through my work at Partakers I 
feel I am part of a team that is 
enabling them to complete their 
education and is preparing them 
to re-enter society." •" 



10 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Connected Learning 



Original Audience Interactive Theatre Work 

Basic Acting Class Performs "The Facebook Chronicles" 




The audience is asked to vote for either 
(L to R) Jenny Viano 'ii, Kate Roberts 'lo 
or Andy Roch 'oy. 



The 1 6 students in Humanities 
Professor Hortense Gerardo's Basic 
Acting Class initially had no idea that 
the pieces they were asked to write at 
the beginning of the semester would 
lead to a 75-minute original production 
titled "The Facebook Chronicles." "I 
asked them to create characters that 
could be based on themselves or be 
fictional and I think that they were 
shocked to discover that by doing their 
homework assignments they had 
actually woven together a piece that 
could be produced," Professor 
Gerardo recalls. 

The theme of the play was coming of 
age in Boston with a story line of a day 
in the life of all the characters. "I picked 
the title 'Facebook Chronicles' because 
it's in keeping with today's college life," 
explains Professor Gerardo. "It's young, 
urban, and hip. 

"I wanted the students to make their 
characters memorable, to give them 
weight, but I also asked them to write 
their pieces with some distance," she 
continues. "I didn't want diary entries. 
I wanted them to be willing to say and 
do what they had written." 



"First we were asked to write 
monologues, then select a classmate to 
do a dialog with, and finally write tetra 
logs," recalls Jenny Viano '11. "We had 
to connect and bring in other actors' 
characters. It became easier as we were 
asked to keep writing and as we all got 
to know each other" 

Professor Gerardo was awarded a 
Putnam grant to make the work 
audience interactive. "I wanted to find a 
way to do it without interrupting the 
narrative," she explains. She enlisted 
the help of Professor Richard Dodds, 
and they incorporated the College's 



to a new level," says Professor Gerardo. 
"They enabled the audience to 
determine the plot without getting in 
the way of the performance. I wanted to 
maintain the flow and I didn't want the 
actors to be playing to the audience." 

Three students from Professor Peter 
Watson's Interior Design and Display 
class created the set for the play, which 
included a large screen for the back of 
the stage where images and questions 
to the audience could be displayed. 
Depending on the audience feedback, 
the play shifl:ed from one story to the 
next. "Each night there was a variable," 




The opening scene of "The Facebook Chronicles. " 

Classroom Performance System (CPS) 
into the play. CPS uses a computer and 
a projector enabling the audience to 
answer questions by beaming their 
clickers onto a receiver. 

"By using the audience cHckers, we 
were able to take interactivity on stage 





^B'-,^^^^U^D ' ' '2K 9^ki_ ^^^^ ^r^ 


W^i^mL 


t 


^.ssji .^m 



The entire "Facebook Chronicles" cast takes a minute before going on stage. (L to R) Kate 
Roberts '10, Jenny Viano '11, Brianna McLellan '11, Sarah Carleton '11, AJ Fox '11, Brian 
Whelan '08, Amanda Cook 'u, Andrew Deitch '11, Karissa Ranken '10, Ashley Medeiros 
'11, Scott Janz '11, and Andy Roch 'oj. 



explains Professor Gerardo. "Was the 
audience up for melancholy or laughs? 
It was exciting not knowing which way 
the play would go." 

The actors were asked to prepare final 
monologues to give if their character 
was selected by the audience as the one 
whose performance they most enjoyed 
that evening. "The Facebook Chronicles" 
were performed twice and Jenny Viano 
and Andy Roch '07 were chosen as the 
"winners" respectively. 

"I was shocked," recalls Jenny. "I knew 
my character was funny, but I thought 
others were much better. I certainly 
wasn't prepared to give my final 
monologue. I froze and couldn't 
remember a thing. I was trembling 
on stage. 

"I think of myself as a shy person, but 
doing this show made me much more 
comfortable and confident. During 
'The Facebook Chronicles' we bonded 
as a group and everyone had a chance 
to shine." «?■ 



MFA Curator 

Lauren Whitley at Lasell 

Collaborative 
Fashion Exhibit 
Presented 



The Wedeman Art Gallery was the 
site of an exhibit that profiled 
evening and cocktail dresses from 
Lasell's Museum Collection. The 
display was the result of a 
collaborative teaching effort. 
Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) Curator 
Lauren Whitley, who is teaching 20th 
Century Fashion at the College this 
year, and her class worked closely 
with both Fashion Professor Peter 
Watson's Interior Design and 
Display class and with Curator of 
the Lasell Museum Collection and 
Fashion Professor Jill Carey to create 
the show. 

"We are so fortunate to have Lauren 
teaching at Lasell," says Professor 
Carey. "The students have been able 
to draw from her depth of 
knowledge and professional 
experience as Curator at the MFA." 

Curator Whitley came to the College 
because she was interested in 
resuming teaching. "I missed having 
contact with students and by 
teaching 20th Century Fashion 
History I have been able to share the 
MFA's collection. When the students 
see our garments their visual 
vocabulary grows and they can draw 
on the ideas they absorb for their 
own designs." 

For the Wedeman exhibit, the 20th 
Century Fashion students used 
garments from the Lasell Museum 
Collection. Once they had selected 
individual pieces they met with 
Professor Carey to conduct research. 
They then worked with Professor 
Watson's display class who built 
frames, wrote timelines and 
added photos. 




{L to R) MFA Curator Lauren 
Whitley and Ashley Abentroth 'og 
adjust a garment. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 1 1 



Connected Learning 



Music, Visual, and Performance Arts Combine 

Spiritus: An Interdisciplinary Event to Honor the Dead 



El Dia De Los Muertos, the Day of 
the Dead, invokes intriguing and 
mystical feelings that are associated 
with thoughts of departed souls. "It's a 
day that has special significance in 
many cultures and this fall we decided 
to hold an interdisciplinary event that 
would honor and celebrate the lives of 
people who have died and whose 
spirits continue to influence the 
living," explains Graphic Design 
Professor Stephen Fischer. "There are 
many rituals associated with the Day 
of the Dead and we drew on some of 
them and created others of our own 
for a program we called Spiritus, 
meaning soul." 

Five faculty members joined Professor 
Fischer in planning the events of the 
day and had their classes participate in 
its creation. By including the ideas of 
the different disciplines, the event 



shrine or display area for the portraits 
and masks. "Professor Fischer 
explained his idea for the altar and 
then left it to us," recalls Shannon 
Oliver '08. "We had to work within a 
budget and create a piece that fit the 
event's mood. I think we bought up 
every piece of black fabric in the area 
to cover the shrine's stairs and we 
designed the fire lighting at the top." 

Students from Professor Hortense 
Gerardo's Anthropology and Folklore 
classes researched and wrote reflective 
papers on their family rituals around 
death. The group came from different 
cultural heritages, including Italian, 
Polish, Irish, and Portuguese and 
shared their various traditions. Their 
research was then used as the basis 
for an original performance given by 
her Basic Acting class. "It was an 
improvisational ritual piece that was 




ij portraits surrounded the altar in the center of the room. 



became a colorful and respectful 
celebration whose mood evolved from 
reflective to upbeat, ending with a 
New Orleans funereal jazz band. 

The students in Professor Fischer's 
Principles of Design and Color class 
were asked to pick a person whose life 
had affected theirs and make a portrait 
honoring that individual. "I didn't 
want them to pick someone they were 
grieving for because I wanted to 
emphasize the celebratory nature of 
the day. I also asked them to think 
about the person and his or her 
heritage and make a border that 
included graphic symbols that 
represented that culture. We then took 
these symbols and used them on 
masks, so there was a visual link 
between the masks and the portraits." 

Professor Peter Watson's Interior 
Design and Display Class created the 



in keeping with the respectfully 
commemorative nature of the 
evening," she explains. 

As people entered de Witt auditorium, 
the sounds of drumming filled the 
background and Lasell's Director 
of Spiritual Life, Rev. Barbara 
Asinger welcomed everyone. 
Michael Belle, a professional soloist, 
then sang two spirituals from the 
African-American tradition. 

The room was lit by luminaries that 
had been created by Professor Margo 
Lemieux's Drawing/ Graphic Design 
class and projection and sound were 
handled by Professor Tore Terrasi and 
his students. Images were thrown on 
the ceiHng and Professor Terrasi 
himself created a special ghost effect 
visible through a small opening in the 
stage curtain using the reflections 
from pieces of glass. 




The colorful masks incorporate symbols 
from the borders of the portraits. 



At the end of the program Emperor 
Norton's Stationary Marching Band 
played. "They were amazing and, 
coincidentally, the material of their 
outfits matched our Central 
American color scheme," recalls 
Devon Reilly '08. "It was an 
incredible evening. People were 
crying, people were comforting, but 
the music at the end made us leave 
feeling upbeat." « 




Fashion Students 
Decorate Benefit 
for Accelerated 
Cure for MS 



It was an evening of fun, 
fashion and fabulous footwear at 
Boston's Hampshire House," 
recalls Fashion Professor Anne 
Vallely, "and a great deal of credit 
for the festive air at the Clow and 
Behold Ball must be given to the 
original artwork and decorations 
of 22 members of my Fashion 
Promotion class." 

Professor Vallely was approached 
by the organizers of the evening to 
see if she would lend her expertise 
and she immediately thought of 
enlisting her students. "It was an 
opportunity for them to experience 
directly the running of a major 
event. The gala benefited 
Accelerated Cure for MS, was 
hosted by Boston's Chanel 5 and 
Susan Wornick, and was attended 
by major figures from the fashion 
world," she says. 




The Basic Acting class performed an 
improvisational piece. 



Student sketches were displayed at 
the benefit. 

The students set about creating 
original sketches that reflected the 
theme and color scheme of the 
evening. They created butterflies 
which floated above their fashion 
illustrations and made drawings of 
fantastic footwear On the actual 
day of the event, the Lasell team 
tackled every job that came their 
way with competence and 
enthusiasm and installed the 
decorations on five floors of the 
Hampshire House. 

"The volunteers dealt with surprise 
issues calmly and with common 
sense," says shoe designer and 
gala co-host Kristina Kozak. "They 
handled everything that was 
thrown at them professionally and 
with great sense. They were all 
incredibly wonderful and 
tremendously helpful in making 
the night run smoothly" ¥ 



12 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Connected Learning 



"Hats from the Heart" 



Accessories Design Students Stitch to Keep Children Warm 



If s been a snowy and cold winter but 
thanks to the talent and efforts of 
Fashion Professor Lynn Blake's 
Accessories Design class the heads of 
many homeless children have been kept 
warm. The students all participated in a 
community service project called "Hats 
from the Heart" that examined the 
social responsibility of their art while 
helping those in need. 

"In the fashion world a misguided 
importance is placed on cultivating a 
culturally acceptable appearance and the 
reality of clothing as an item of basic 
survival becomes watered down," says 
Professor Blake. "This project aims to 
move design focus from desire to 
functionality — to focus on the need for 
children to simply and deservedly keep 
and stay warm." 



Students were provided with warm 
fleece and a pattern for a reversible 
child's hat in sizes from infant to seven 
years old. The results were not only 
practical, they were fun, with rabbit's 
ears, tails, and funny faces. 

■The finished hats were given to "Cradles 
to Crayons," a non-profit organization 
that provides basic essentials to low- 
income and homeless children and 
partners with social service agencies for 
distribution. "The great thing about the 
project was that our results were so 
tangible," says Lisa Jesse '08. "A 
horrifying statistic is that the average 
age of a homeless person in the United 
States is eight years old and it is so nice 
to think that we were able to help in 
some small way." W 




(L to R) Fashion students Vivienne Lowe 'og, Lisa Jesse '08, Salvatore Gianni III '08, and 
Christine Famell 'og critique the finished hats. 



Contest for Inauguration Gown 

Mary Barbara Alexander Picks Student Design for Gala 




Theresa Lombardi 'og 's winning sketch. 

I he beautiful flowing lavender evening 
dress that Mary Barbara Alexander wore 
to her husband's Inauguration Gala was 
created especially for her by Theresa 
Lombardi '09 as a result of a unique 
connected learning contest. "It occurred 
to me that designing my dress would be 
a wonderful opportunity for the Lasell 
Fashion Design students to test their 



creativity and for the winner to have 



the experience of taking a dress from 
concept to completion, with her y' — 



concept to completion, with her piece 
being seen by all at the Gala," says 
Mary Barbara. 



There was immediate excitement when 
Mary Barbara approached Fashion 
Professor Maritza Farrell with the idea. 
"I knew it would be fun and, more 
importantly, it was a great chance for 
the students to test their design abilities 
while working within guidelines that 
have been set by a client," says Professor 
Farrell. "I talked with Fashion Professor 
Joan Morris and we decided to open 
the contest up to the juniors in her 
Technical Pattern Drafting II class." 

Mary Barbara met with the juniors and 
explained what she was looking for in 
the dress. "I told them what colors 
worked for my skin tone, what designers 
I like, that I was looking for a flowing 
fabric, and it needed to be a dress that 
I could dance in," she recalls. "Students 
asked me questions and one wondered 
if I wanted the design to be conservative 
or glamorous. 'Glamorous,' I said, 'I'm 
an actress!'" 

Eleven students entered the contest 
and Mary Barbara picked Theresa's 
design. "My daughter said, 'This one 
looks like you,"' when she saw it," 
recalls Mary Barbara. "It's Ralph 
Lauren meets Valentino." 



Mary Barbara has been sewing since 
she was eleven and while in New York 
she picked out the silk chiffon and silk 
charmeuse fabric for the gown. "The 
colors change when you layer them 
differently," says Professor Farrell, who 
worked with Theresa as she constructed 
the dress. "We needed to see which 
arrangement of the fabrics would 
bring us closest to the color in 
Theresa's sketch." 



With Professor Farrell's guidance, 
Theresa worked many hours making 
the dress. "I had four pages of notes 
on how to sew the dress," says 
Theresa. "I couldn't believe it when 
my gown was chosen and even 
though the sketch is now a reality it 
still hasn't really sunk in." Mary 
Barbara will be modeling the dress in 
the Spring Fashion Show and again 
over Reunion Weekend, e 




(L to R) Professor Maritza Farrell, Professor Joan Morris, Theresa Lombardi 'og and Mary 
Barbara Alexander discuss the best way to layer the gown's fabric. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves Q 



Connected Learning 



"And Still We Rise" 

Former Prisoners Bring Powerful Performance to Lasell 



Students and facixlty filled de Witt Hall 
for a performance by former prisoners 
that was sponsored by the Donahue 
Institute and Criminal Justice Honors 
students. The strains of Marvin Gaye's 
"What's Going On?" quieted the hum of 
conversation and audience members 
were surprised when their neighbors 
rose from their seats and went on stage. 
This is the first lesson of "And Still We 
Rise" — former prisoners look like 
anybody else. Ninety-seven percent of 
incarcerated men and women return to 
the community and interact with an 
unknowing public every day. The 
stereotype must be wrong. 

"And Still We Rise" is a collaboration 
of theatre artists and social justice 
advocates who work together with ex- 
prisoners and their loved ones to bring 
a powerful, articulate, personal voice of 
prison experience to the public for the 
purpose of healing, education, 
empowerment, and social change. 

It began at City Mission in Boston as a 
therapeutic means of self-expression. 



"It was a way to get former prisoners 
to talk about themselves and get them 
out of their shells," says Sociology 
Professor Jenifer Drew, who was 
instrumental in bringing the program 
to Lasell. "Their stories are very 
powerful and tliey started performing 
pieces that discussed their growing up, 
imprisonment, survival, and re-entry." 

"Prison is not there to reform you," 
said an actor. "It warehouses you. You 
have to refuse to lose and take yourself 
out of the vicious revolving door cycle 
that happens to many prisoners." 

"You have to learn to love yourself," 
explained another former prisoner. 
"I was mentally incarcerated and I 
found that when you get self-respect, 
everyone will respect you. You can 
grow if you choose to. When you have 
a lot of time to talk to cockroaches and 
ants you get to know yourself. I had 
to dig deep into my faith and be 
determined never to say 'no.' I started 
working in the law library and read 20 



— 30 books a month. I worked out, 
stayed healthy and thought healthy." 

The troupe is used to performing in 
places where the audience is involved in 
the prison reform movement. Lasell was 
a challenge for them because there was 
a need to persuade. A "talk-back" was 
held at the end of the performance and 
students' questions prompted a lively 
debate about the purposes of 
incarceration and the need for 
rehabilitative services in prison. 

"Our job is to educate the audience," 
said an actor. "Once people come to an 
understanding that rehabilitation makes 
prisoners take responsibility for what 
they've done, the hope is that the 
audience's feelings will be ameliorated. 
Talking at Lasell stiffened our spine and 
I hope we opened doors because when 
you change your heart it feels so good." W 



Poetry and Jazz Reverberate in de Witt 

Nationally Known Artists Magdalena Gomez and 
Fred Ho Perform 



Poetry and music are brute 
necessities, not luxuries," said poet, 
playwright, and arts educator 
Magdalena Gomez as she introduced 
the spellbinding performance that was 
about to follow. In a program titled 
"Caliente!! Circle round the Sun: 
Revolutions in Poetry and Jazz," she 
and baritone saxophone player Fred Ho 
filled de Witt Hall with the cadence of 
word and music. The event was 
sponsored by the Office of Student 
Activities, the Donahue Institute 
for Values and Pubic Life, and the 
Honors Program. 




(L to R) Fred Ho and Magdalena Gomez 
deliver a powerful performance. 



Ms. Gomez began her multidisciplinary 
arts career as a performance poet and 
cultural worker. Her early plays and 
poems were performed in prisons, 
hospitals, conferences, and multi- 
denominational houses of worship. 
She has used the arts as a means of 
inspiring leadership and civic 
engagement. Now living in 
Springfield, MA , she has founded a 
theater-education-social action 
collaboration, Teatro Vida, which 
embraces respect and the celebration 
of diversity at its core. 

Fred Ho is the leader and founder of the 
Afro-Asian Jazz Ensemble and many of 
his works fuse the melodies from the 
indigenous and traditional musics of 
these two cultures. He has won 
prestigious recognition including from 
the McKnight Foundation, the 
Rockefeller Foundation, and the 
National Endowment for the Arts. 

The program began with Ms. Gomez 
delivering a powerful reading of several 
of her poems. Her words reverberated, 
delivering a message that although at 



times humorous, carried a cutting 
political or social message. "Mine is a 
journaHstic poetry," she said. "My eyes 
are always awake and when I see 
something, I take a note." 

Using the deep sounds of the baritone 
sax, Fred Ho played three pieces that 
told the stories of early Japanese, 
Chinese, and Filipino immigrants. In 
his journey as an Asian-American artist, 
he has delved deeply into the history of 
each of these populations. His study of 
Japanese folk songs was the inspiration 
for his first number. "Old fishing songs 
became songs for the Japanese who 
arrived in Hawaii to work on the sugar 
plantations. They were sung exclusively 
by women and the earthiness comes 
from the hardship they endured," 
he explained. 

At the conclusion of the program, 
the two artists performed together with 
Fred Ho improvising to the rhythms 
of Ms. Gomez's poems. It was unique 
and inspiring. *>' 




Support and Advocacy 
for Prisoners 

Marian Salama 
'08 Interns at 
Partakers 



The goal 
of Partakers is 
to assist in 
the healing 
transformation 
of prisoners," 
explains Legal 
Studies major Marian Salama '08 
who did her fall internship at the 
Auburndale, MA non-profit 
organization and who is continuing 
her work there this semester as a 
directed study. "We train volunteers 
to be mentors to support the 
inmates who are in the Boston 
University Prison Education 
Program. A bachelor's degree 
means so much to the prisoners 
and being part of helping them 
regain their self-respect is intense 
and meaningful." 

Partakers takes great care in pairing 
up the volunteers and the prisoners. 
"We read the files of both parties," 
explains Marian "and each inmate 
has a team of four to six volunteers 
from congregations throughout 
Greater Boston that works with him 
or hen We want to make as good a 
fit as we can. The volunteers are the 
inmate's contact with the outside 
world and there needs to be a 
feeling of trust." 

During her internship Marian 
assisted with the volunteers' 
orientation. "We go over how to 
dress and act and discuss situations 
that might come up," she explains. 
"After the initial meeting we have a 
follow-up session to recap what 
happened. Sometimes former 
prisoners will come and give 
suggestions for changes. From 
listening to them, it is apparent 
how much their education means. 

"Incarcerated men and women are 
often in prison because of poverty 
and a lack of education. The outside 
world can seem a long way off. 
Through my work at Partakers I 
feel I am part of a team that is 
enabling them to complete their 
education and is preparing them 
to re-enter society." « 



10 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Connected Learning 



Original Audience Interactive Theatre Work 



Basic Acting Class Performs "The Facebook Chronicles" 




The audience is asked to vote for either 
(L to R) Jenny Viano 'ii, Kate Roberts 'lo 
or Andy Roch 'oy. 



The i6 students in Humanities 
Professor Hortense Gerardo's Basic 
Acting Class initially had no idea that 
the pieces they were asked to write at 
the beginning of the semester would 
lead to a 75 -minute original production 
titled "The Facebook Chronicles." "I 
asked them to create characters that 
could be based on themselves or be 
fictional and I think that they were 
shocked to discover that by doing their 
homework assignments they had 
actually woven together a piece that 
could be produced," Professor 
Gerardo recalls. 

The theme of the play was coming of 
age in Boston with a story line of a day 
in the life of aU the characters. "I picked 
the title 'Facebook Chronicles' because 
it's in keeping with today's college life," 
explains Professor Gerardo. "It's young, 
urban, and hip. 

"I wanted the students to make their 
characters memorable, to give them 
weight, but I also asked them to write 
their pieces with some distance," she 
continues. "I didn't want diary entries. 
I wanted them to be willing to say and 
do what they had written." 



"First we were asked to write 
monologues, then select a classmate to 
do a dialog with, and finally write tetra 
logs," recalls Jenny Viano '11. "We had 
to connect and bring in other actors' 
characters. It became easier as we were 
asked to keep writing and as we all got 
to know each other." 

Professor Gerardo was awarded a 
Putnam grant to make the work 
audience interactive. "I wanted to find a 
way to do it without interrupting the 
narrative," she explains. She enlisted 
the help of Professor Richard Dodds, 
and they incorporated the College's 



to a new level," says Professor Gerardo. 
"They enabled the audience to 
determine the plot without getting in 
the way of the performance. I wanted to 
maintain the flow and I didn't want the 
actors to be playing to the audience." 

Three students from Professor Peter 
Watson's Interior Design and Display 
class created the set for the play, which 
included a large screen for the back of 
the stage where images and questions 
to the audience could be displayed. 
Depending on the audience feedback, 
the play shifted from one story to the 
next. "Each night there was a variable," 




The opening scene of "The Facebook Chronicles. 

Classroom Performance System (CPS) 
into the play. CPS uses a computer and 
a projector enabling the audience to 
answer questions by beaming their 
clickers onto a receiver 

"By using the audience clickers, we 
were able to take interactivity on stage 




The entire "Facebook Chronicles" cast takes a minute before going on stage. (L to Rj Kate 
Roberts '10, Jenny Viano '11, Brianna McLellan '11, Sarah Carleton '11, AJ Fox '11, Brian 
Whelan '08, Amanda Cook '11, Andrew Deitch 'n, Karissa Ranken '10, Ashley Medeiros 
'11, Scott Janz '11, and Andy Roch 'oj. 



explains Professor Gerardo. "Was the 
audience up for melancholy or laughs? 
It was exciting not knowing which way 
the play would go." 

The actors were asked to prepare final 
monologues to give if their character 
was selected by the audience as the one 
whose performance they most enjoyed 
that evening. "The Facebook Chronicles" 
were performed twice and Jenny Viano 
and Andy Roch '07 were chosen as the 
"wiimers" respectively. 

"I was shocked," recalls Jenny. "I knew 
my character was funny, but I thought 
others were much better. I certainly 
wasn't prepared to give my final 
monologue. I froze and couldn't 
remember a thing. I was trembling 
on stage. 

"I think of myself as a shy person, but 
doing this show made me much more 
comfortable and confident. During 
'The Facebook Chronicles' we bonded 
as a group and everyone had a chance 
to shine." >•' 



M FA Curator 

Lauren Whitley at Lasell 

Collaborative 
Fashion Exhibit 
Presented 



■ he Wedeman Art Gallery was the 
site of an exhibit that profiled 
evening and cocktail dresses from 
Lasell's Museum Collection. The 
display was the result of a 
collaborative teaching effort. 
Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) Curator 
Lauren Whitley, who is teaching 20th 
Century Fashion at the College this 
year, and her class worked closely 
with both Fashion Professor Peter 
Watson's Interior Design and 
Display class and with Curator of 
the Lasell Museum Collection and 
Fashion Professor Jill Carey to create 
the show. 

"We are so fortunate to have Lauren 
teaching at Lasell," says Professor 
Carey "The students have been able 
to draw from her depth of 
knowledge and professional 
experience as Curator at the MFA." 

Curator Whitley came to the College 
because she was interested in 
resuming teaching. "I missed having 
contact with students and by 
teaching 20th Century Fashion 
History I have been able to share the 
MFA's collection. When the students 
see our garments their visual 
vocabulary grows and they can draw 
on the ideas they absorb for their 
own designs." 

For the Wedeman exhibit, the 20th 
Century Fashion students used 
garments from the Lasell Museum 
Collection. Once they had selected 
individual pieces they met with 
Professor Carey to conduct research. 
They then worked with Professor 
Watson's display class who built 
frames, wrote timelines and 
added photos. 




fl to R) MFA Curator Lauren 
Whitley and Ashley Abentroth 'og 
adjust a garment. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves II 



P 



¥n 






Connected Learning 



Music, Visual, and Performance Arts Combine 

Spiritus: An Interdisciplinary Event to Honor the Dead 



Cl Dia De Los Muertos, the Day of 
the Dead, invokes intriguing and 
mystical feehngs that are associated 
with tlioughts of departed souls. "It's a 
day that has special significance in 
many cultures and this fall we decided 
to hold an interdisciplinary event that 
would honor and celebrate the lives of 
people who have died and whose 
spirits continue to influence the 
living," explains Graphic Design 
Professor Stephen Fischer. "There are 
many rituals associated with the Day 
of the Dead and we drew on some of 
them and created others of otir own 
for a program we called Spiritus, 
meaning soul." 

Five faculty members joined Professor 
Fischer in planning the events of the 
day and had their classes participate in 
its creation. By including the ideas of 
the different disciplines, the event 



shrine or display area for the portraits 
and masks. "Professor Fischer 
explained his idea for the altar and 
then left it to us," recalls Shannon 
Oliver '08. "We had to work within a 
budget and create a piece that fit the 
event's mood. I think we bought up 
eveiy piece of black fabric in the area 
to cover the shrine's stairs and we 
designed the fire lighting at the top." 

Students from Professor Hortense 
Gerardo's Anthropology and Folklore 
classes researched and wrote reflective 
papers on their family rituals around 
death. The group came from different 
cultural heritages, including Italian, 
Polish, Irish, and Portuguese and 
shared their various traditions. Their 
research was then used as the basis 
for an original performance given by 
her Basic Acting class. "It was an 
improvisational ritual piece that was 




ly portraits surrounded the altar in the center of the room. 



became a colorful and respectful 
celebration whose mood evolved from 
reflective to upbeat, ending with a 
New Orleans fiinereal jazz band. 

The students in Professor Fischer's 
Principles of Design and Color class 
were asked to pick a person whose life 
had affected theirs and make a portrait 
honoring that individual. "I didn't 
want them to pick someone they were 
grieving for because I wanted to 
emphasize the celebratory nature of 
the day. I also asked them to think 
about the person and his or her 
heritage and make a border that 
included graphic symbols that 
represented that culture. We then took 
these symbols and used them on 
masks, so there was a visual link 
between the masks and the portraits." 

Professor Peter Watson's Interior 
Design and Display Class created the 



in keeping with the respectfully 
commemorative nature of the 
evening," she explains. 

As people entered de Witt auditorium, 
the sounds of drumming filled the 
background and Lasell's Director 
of Spiritual Life, Rev. Barbara 
Asinger welcomed everyone. 
Michael Belle, a professional soloist, 
then sang two spirituals from the 
African- American tradition. 

The room was lit by luminaries that 
had been created by Professor Margo 
Lemieiax's Drawing/ Graphic Design 
class and projection and sound were 
handled by Professor Tore Terrasi and 
his students. Images were thrown on 
the ceiling and Professor Terrasi 
himself created a special ghost effect 
visible through a small opening in the 
stage curtain using the reflections 
from pieces of glass. 




The colorful masks incorporate symbols 
from the borders of the portraits. 



At the end of the program Emperor 
Norton's Stationary Marching Band 
played. "They were amazing and, 
coincidentally, the material of their 
outfits matched our Central 
American color scheme," recalls 
Devon Reilly '08. "It was an 
incredible evening. People were 
crying, people were comforting, but 
the music at the end made us leave 
feeling upbeat." W 




Fashion Students 
Decorate Benefit 
for Accelerated 
Cure for MS 



It was an evening of fun, 
fashion and fabulous footwear at 
Boston's Hampshire House," 
recalls Fashion Professor Anne 
Vallely, "and a great deal of credit 
for the festive air at the Glow and 
Behold Ball must be given to the 
original artwork and decorations 
of 22 members of my Fashion 
Promotion class." 

Professor Vallely was approached 
by the organizers of the evening to 
see if she would lend her expertise 
and she immediately thought of 
enlisting her students. "It was an 
opportunity for them to experience 
directly the running of a major 
event. The gala benefited 
Accelerated Cure for MS, was 
hosted by Boston's Chanel 5 and 
Susan Wornick, and was attended 
by major figures from the fashion 
world," she says. 




The Basic Acting class performed an 
improvisational piece. 



Student sketches were displayed at 
the benefit. 

The students set about creating 
original sketches that reflected the 
theme and color scheme of the 
evening. They created butterflies 
which floated above their fashion 
illustrations and made drawings of 
fantastic footwear. On the actual 
day of the event, the Lasell team 
tackled every job that came their 
way with competence and 
enthusiasm and installed the 
decorations on five floors of the 
Hampshire House. 

"The volunteers dealt with surprise 
issues calmly and with common 
sense," says shoe designer and 
gala co-host Kristina Kozak. "They 
handled everything that was 
thrown at them professionally and 
with great sense. They were all 
incredibly wonderful and 
tremendously helpful in making 
the night run smoothly." V 



12 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 




Ci/^^s^ note^s^ 



EDITOR'S NOTE: In the interest of protecting the privacy of our alumni, it is the policy of the Alumni 
Relations Office not to divulge alumni addresses, e-mail addresses, or phone numbers unless it has been 
verified that the request is from another alumnus. 

The content of Class Notes is based on material submitted to Lasell College's Alumni Office. Due to 
the large number of submissions, Lasell is unable to verify the factual content of each entry and is not 
responsible for erroneous material. 

The Class Notes printed in this issue w/ere received by March 3, 2008 and notes received after that 
date will appear in the next issue. If you w/ish to have a photograph returned, please include a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope. 

Please send your new/s to the Alumni Office at 1844 Commonw/ealth Avenue, Newton, MA 02466-2716. 

YOU MAY EMAIL CLASS NOTES OR ADDRESS CHANCES TO US AT alumni@lasell.edu 

\jyou have not received an enn ail from us in the last three months, we do not have your current 
email address. Please send it to alumni@lasell.edu and include all your current information: 
name, address, and telephone number. 



1930*5 



1937 

"I am a 91-year-old graduate of Lasell 
and had the most amazing experience," 
writes Barbara Bumham Rice. "Haifa 
continent and three quarters of a 
century away from graduation, I had 
the pleasure of running into another 
graduate. I'm living in an assisted living 
apartment which has a happy hour 
every Friday. A woman came along and 
sat next to me. We began sharing 
histories. She said she had lived most 
of her life in Puerto Rico except for a 
couple of years spent in the states when 
she was in college. When I asked her 
where she attended college, she replied 
LaseU. I was shocked. Here we are, 
living in Texas, both in our go's, and we 
found a connection. What fun we had 
reminiscing about days gone by." 

1938 

Our sincere condolences to Connie 
Hatch Herron on the death of her 
husband, Bruce, in March 2007. 

1939 

Jeanne Daniels Wheeler's husband had 
a massive stroke and is confined to a 
nursing home. 

Doris Huntington Manning is doing 
well. She is living in an assisted living 
facility in South Carolina. 



i94o's 



1943 

"Just one year ago I left Orlando to 
move to a retirement home in New 
Hampshire near two of my children," 
writes Betty Gorton Collier. "It seems 
to have everything I could possibly need 
or desire." Betty continues, "It was 
wonderful to be near enough to Lasell 
to attend Tom de Witt's farewell and the 
reception for our new president. Life 
couldn't be better." 

Nazarene Mondello Stramondo is 

delighted to announce the birth of 
her second grandchild, a grandson, 
in July 2007. 

1945 

Our sincere condolences to Jane 
Baringer Wordsworth on the death of 
her husband, Winston, in February. 



From Sarasota, FL, Terry Bergeron Hoyt 

sends an update: "I still work as a 
volunteer and am a member of my 
community's food committee. If s the 
same old story — some like the food, 
some don't. I recently became a 
member of the Sarasota Ballet 
Association. I look forward to seeing 
their productions this season. I will be 
recovering from surgery in December. 
I feel fine and know all will be well 
again after a much needed rest." 

Cousins Dorothy Domina WUlard and 
Clarice Lothrop Davin '43 spent an 
enjoyable day touring northeastern 
Vermont during fall foliage season. 

1947 

Barbara Adler Melone celebrated 60 
years working for the Massachusetts 
Medical Society. She has filled varied 
roles over the years including executive 
secretary, director of membership, and 
administrative assistant in the executive 
office. Currently she is membership 
information administrator Regarding 
retirement she says, "I will keep going 
as long as I can contribute to the 
organization, its members, and 
mission." In her free time, Barbara 
knits, does embroidery, gardens, 
consumes 40 to 50 books of all kinds 
each year, and is a sports fanatic when it 
comes to the Red Sox and the Patriots. 

1948 

Our sincere condolences to Honey 
Markham Wedeman on the death of her 
husband, Joe, in October and to Ann 
Truex Dickinson on the death of her 
husband, Warren, in February. 

1949 

Ann Fletcher Simonds lives most of the 
year in the Florida Keys. She has been 
writing for publications since Lasell and 
was the first editor of the Littleton 
Independent in 1955. "Better Laugh 
than Cry" is a collection of her essays on 
topics ranging from raising children 
and pets to travel near-disasters. Her 
other book is a fictionalized history of 
the Fletcher family for young readers. 
Her four children are scattered from 
North Conway, NH, to Austin, TX to 
Monterey, CA. 



1950*5 



1950 

Our sincere condolences to Joan Antun 
Rednor on the death of her husband, 
Charles, in November. 

1951 

"We now have 10 grandchildren — 
the latest being twins born in 
October," Lois Hutchinson Woodward 
proudly exclaims. 

1952 

An update from Roberta Benvenuti: 

"Seven years ago I retired as COO of 
Bonwit Teller Corp. I live in Syracuse 
but spend the winters in Boca Raton 
enjoying the warm sunshine. Since 
retiring I have tiaveled, done a lot of 
gardening, and am enjoying two great- 
grandchildren. Last summer I finally 
met up with my dear friend, Millicent 
Jewell Bruce, in Rockport, MA. We 
spent a wonderful day reminiscing 
about our fun days at Lasell." 

Ginny Johnson Irwin writes, "I'm 
recovering from a long illness but 
getting stronger every day. I hope to see 
Peggy Thompson Wheatley in Florida. 

1953 

Dot Day Bardarson was the master 
artist for the 2007 Seward, AK 
mural project. The mural entitled 



"Remembering Exit Glacier," is 52 feet 
by 20 feet. Thirty-six local artists helped 
to paint it including Lasell classmate, 
Carol McKay Chaudiere. The mural 
will be hung at the Alaska Vocational 
Technical School. Dot reminisces 
that Jackie Saunders, who lives in 
Westwood, MA, was her art teacher at 
Lasell, and they have stayed in touch 
for the past 54 years. Dot has been 
living in Alaska for 37 years. 

"All is well," writes Ginger Wilder 
Melitz. "I am still snowshoeing. 
Our family is growing, and our first 
great-grandchild is due in May." 

1955 

Bobbie Jennings hit the road again in 
an RV The tiip began in Sonoma 
County, CA, with Winchester Bay, OR 
as the final destination. She writes, 
"We drove through lovely wine country, 
rolling farmlands, pine forests, and 
winding rivers." Bobbie had this to say 
about camping. "It was designed for 
camping. The space is comfortable, 
cozy, and uncluttered." One highlight of 
the trip was an all-terrain dune buggy 
ride over the Oregon dunes. "It was an 
exhilarating experience." 

Sandra Lally Hovey says it was a great 
year for traveling. She went to 
Disneyland; Reno; Mesa, AZ; and 
Germany. She still insists that the 
Pacific Northwest is a great place to live. 



Class ofi%^ 




Dot Da,y Bardarson at work on the Seward, AK mural project. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Class Notes I3 



Class Notes 



"My II grandchildren, ages 3 years to 24 
years, hosted a family reunion at the 
Marriott Hotel on Singer Island, FL in 
)une. " writes Valerie Montanez Barto. 
"It was the greatest." Valerie invites 
classmates to visit when they are in 
West Palm Beach. 

1956 

While in Japan in October. Atch Ruinen 
Slapper and her husband, Erik, former 
chair of the Lasell Board of Trustees, 
had lunch with Emi Sato '99, spent a 
full day with Overseer Sally Ishihara, 
and had dinner with Atch's housemate 
from Conn House, Yumiko Hattori 
Furuhata and her husband. Atch and 
Yiuniko had not seen each other since 
graduation. Atch says, "All the \'isits 
were fun." 



Class ofiQ^G 




(L to R) Erik Stapper, Atch Ruinen 
Stapper, Yumiko Hattori Furuhata. 
Standing: Mike Furuhata 



Class ofig^G 




The Stappers and a friend. 



Class ofig^G 




(L to R) Ginny Paolillo Lawlor and 
Kaye Mackler Aronson. roommates 
during their senior year at Lasell, 
met for lunch on Cape Cod infuly. 
"We had our own mini-reunion!" 



An update from Pattie Holland Bird: 

"We are still enjoying our summers 
in Massachusetts and our winters in 
Naples. I am busy with sewing and 
stained glass and enjoying my nine 
grandchildren. This past summer I 
had open heart surgery." 

1957 

Ginny Krauss White and her husband, 
James, celebrated their 50th wedding 
anniversary in August. They have four 
children and nine grandchildren. 



Class ofig^y 





Fifty years ago and today: Ginny Krauss 
White and her husband, fames. 



In October, Peggy Ann Kenison Glaister 

was an alumni delegate representing 
Lasell College at the Houghton College 
presidential inauguration. 

Evelyn Sanders Brewster and her 
husband celebrated their 50th wedding 
anniversary at a party in July given by 
their four children and spouses in 
Wolfeboro, NH. Evelyn says, "Among 
the guests were my two bridesmaids, 
my Lasell roommates, Marcia Jones 
Leighton and Ann Bidwell Sanborn, 
and my five grandchildren. What a 
wonderful time we all had!" 

1958 

Mary Ann Fuller Young was an alumni 
delegate representing Lasell College at 
the presidential inauguration at Saint 
Michael's College in September. 

In mid November, Ann Reeves Burtoris 

book about retailing, "If s all about 
Retailing: Attracting, Building, and 
Keeping Customers," was released. Ann 
says, "It will make a great text book as 
well as provide excellent advice for 
entrepreneurs who want to go into 
business for themselves." Ann will be 
offering a seminar on retailing during 
reunion weekend. 



1959 

Peg Thomas Graff quips: "Another year, 
another birthday, and every birthday is a 
gift. There is a fellow in his 80s who 
walks about 12+ miles every day. He 
says his goal is to 'stay above ground.' 
I walk about 4 miles every day with 
three Boston Terriers, and I think that 
is good." 



1960*5 



1960 

An announcement from Mary 
McCartney Kuhrtz: "Any member of the 
class of '60 who would like to celebrate 
our 50th reunion with a boat trip in 
France in the fall 2009 (for alums 
only), please contact Sue Spangenberg 
Straley, suestraley@aol.com; 
Joyce Wheeler Gardner, 
ioanmartin@htva.net; or me, 
mkuhrtz@aol.com." The "illustrious, 
rowdy classmates" planning this 
reunion are Faith Bowker-Maloney, 
Barbara McAlary Kashar, Mary 
McCartney Kuhrtz, Sue Spangenberg 
Straley and Joyce Wheeler Gardner. 



Class ofigSo 




Four friends from the Class ofigGo 
attended the Cape Cod event at the 
home offoan Conradi McLaughlin 
'^g in September (L to R) foyce 
Wheeler Gardner, Mary McCartney 
Kuhrtz, Barbara McAlary Kashar, 
Cricket Bigelow George. 



Our sincere condolences to Carol 
Vincent Cook whose husband, Peter, 
died three years ago of lung cancer. 
Recently Carol moved from Florida, 
where she had been living for the past 
38 years, to NYC to share an apartment 
with her daughter and i-year-old 
granddaughter. Carol says, "Quite a 
lifestyle adjustment!" Carol stays in 
touch with Carlene Michael Haines 
who recently moved into a new house 
in Meriden, CT. Carol would enjoy 
getting together with classmates 
who are living in NYC or visiting 
the "Big Apple." 

1961 

Our sincere condolences to Karla 
Robinson Dunham on the death of her 
husband, Edward, in October. 

Nan Sparks Hunter proudly announced 
that her grandkids total eight. She says, 
"I am working full-time but find time 
for extensive traveling once a year. 
There was Africa in 2007 and China 
in 2008." Nan hopes to make the 
next reunion. 



1962 

Our sincere condolences to Sally 
Remley Southmayd on the death of her 
father, James Remley, in November. Mr. 
Remley was the conductor of Lasell's 
Orphean Club for many years. 

1963 

Penny Peterson Atwell and her golden 
retriever, Bear, are an incredible team. 
Bear is a therapy dog with Therapy 
Dogs International. Penny and Bear 
visit patients in nursing homes, 
Alzheimer's units, and have recently 
been asked to work with hospice. Penny 
says, "Bear has so many fans at the 
places we visit. He seems to understand 
what patients need from him." 



Class of 1^63 




Penny Peterson Atwell and Bear. 



1964 

In October, Marsha Graziano Ballantyne 

was an alumni delegate representing 
Lasell College at the presidential 
inauguration at Assumption College. 

1965 

Carole Bellew was an alumni delegate 
representing Lasell College at the 
presidential inauguration at The 
New England College of Optometry 
in September. 

1966 

"I can't believe I'm 61 years old and my 
Lasell graduation was over 40 years 
ago," writes Nancy Palmer Brandston. 
"I retired last year so I have had one 
year to relax. I love retirement." 
Along with retirement usually comes 
downsizing, but not so for Nancy. 
"We need a place where I can utilize 
some of my new found time for a 
favorite pastime — gourmet cooking in 
a gourmet kitchen." In September, 
Nancy had a mini reunion in LaQuinta, 
CA, with "old" friends from Draper 
House: Sandra Shadle Marsilius, Gail 
MacLean Wilbum, Susan Zele 
Buxbaum, Susan Roberts Richey (the 
host). Nancy says, "We look forward to 
another reunion in 2008 with two 
additional Draper girls: Carolyn Graham 
Romyn and Judy Locke Lorenzo." 



lA. Lasell Class Notes 



Spring 2008 



Class Notes 



Class ofig66 



Class ofigGg 



Class of 1^88 




In October, Lois Sawyer Caulfield 
was an alumni delegate representing 
Lasell College at the Siena College 
presidential inauguration. 



1967 

"I will be celebrating 39 years of 
marriage to my husband, Fred," writes 
Sandra Erkis Summer. "We have three 
grown children, and I am grandmother 
to an adorable granddaughter." 

Jane Lazarz is the president and 
designer of In-between Court & 
Sportswear in Huntington Beach, CA. 
It all began when Jane move from New 
England to southern California in 1990 
and decided to take up tennis. As she 
got into the game, she felt the need to 
design a line of clothing "that departed 
from the frilly or polka-dot panties that 
were the fashion at the time." Her 
innovative sportswear is known for 
its smart balance of form, function, 
and fashion. 

Congratulations to Kathy Morgan Lucey 
on the birth of her third grandchild, 
a grandson. 

1968 

Lisa Altshuler Freidus moved to Fort 
Myers, FL, to be near her daughter and 
family. Lisa has this announcement: 
"We will be grandparents this spring. 
We are so excited." 

Jackie Hofimeier Lee had eight Lasell 
"girls" at her wedding in December 
2006: Mamie Ewart Bacot, Anne Kusik 
Roush, Stephanie Pendleton, Melinda 
Smith Partridge, Carol Spindler 
Picciano, Ann Sterner Tyler, Pat 
Torbron Geoghegan, and Libby 
Wissman Walendziewicz. 

1969 

Robin Hausman Morris had this to say 
in the eulogy she gave for Susan Hartsig 
Lek who died of cervical cancer in 
October "I am here to tell you about 
one very special friendship, one that 
bore the test of time and circumstance. 
Susan was my college roommate, nearly 
40 years ago, and now as my children 
form new alliances, I wonder who in 
their lives will weather the storms that 



iv 





(L to R) Susan Hartsig Lek and 
Robin Hausman Morris. 



life offers. Susan was that person. We 
met in 1968 at Lasell. We simply grew 
up together, solidifying a bond, as 
teenagers to adults." Robin ended the 
eulogy with this simple statement: "And 
so I now say goodbye to my dear friend, 
never forgotten, simply at peace." 



1970*5 



1970 

Maggie Cohen Sherman writes, "I am a 
community celebration artist. I use art 
as the medium to bring people 
together." Check out Maggie's website: 
www.handsonproduct.com. In February, 
there was an exhibit of 25 years of 
Maggie's work entitled, "A Mid-career 
Retrospective — Beyond Warm and 
Fuzzy!" at the Vermont State House 
in Montpelier. 

1973 

Robin Genden owns an optometric 
practice in Mashpee on Cape Cod. 
She has a 13-year-old son. Robin says, 
"I loved Lasell and hope to hear from 
some of my classmates." 

In October, Janet Peck Riordan was an 

alumni delegate representing Lasell 
College at the presidential inauguration 
at Antioch University in Los Angeles. 

Chris Urbano is a director of nursing. 
Her daughter is graduating college and 
her son is graduating the University of 
Texas LBJ School of Pubhc Affairs. 

1978 

There was an exhibit of 33 pieces of 
Sandra Beraha's art at the Joseph 
Thomas Galleries in White Plains, NY 
in November. Her website is: 
www.artwanted.com/sandraberaha. 

1979 

Christine Tribou is negotiating with 
Lippencott Williams & Wilkins 
Publishers regarding writing some text 
on nursing for them. She says, "I have 
been wined and dined by them. I am 
thrilled with the prospect." 




Laura French McKenna and her husband, Brian, cheered for the Red Sox in game 1 of 
the World Series. Laura says, "The game was awesome. " 



1980*5 



1990*5 



1982 

Lisa Allen McGofF lives in Medford, MA 
with her husband and three children. 
She stays in touch with Lori Stein 
Ferrari who lives in Connecticut. Lisa 
says, "I would love to hear from some 
of you and be updated on your lives." 

1985 

Our sincere condolences to Jill Flaherty 

Mazzola on the death of her sister, Joan. 

1987 

Dayra de La Guardia de Arias writes, 
"I would like to know about my 
friends from Lasell. My email is 
darias@semusarealty.com. Please 
contact me." 

1989 

Victoria Linares Ceylan and her 

husband of 14-1/2 years live in 
Danbury, CT with their 6-year-old son. 
Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, and she 
and her husband own a business. 



Class ofigg^ 



1994 

Rebecca Hodgkins is director of 
marketing for Cramer, a digital 
marketing and event solutions agency 
in Norwood, MA. Rebecca is in an 
MBA program at Curry College. 



Class ofigg4 




Rebecca Hodgkins. 



Class of 1995 






1 



Brandi Robinson Dunlop enjoys a 
dance with her husband, Bill Dunlop, 
Jr., at her wedding in July zooy. 



Amy Kohut Farina enjoys her 
wedding day with several Lasell 
friends (L to R) Kerry Brody Barber, 
Amy, Brenda Bemier Atallah, 
Jessica Tabolt Magne. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Class Notes 1 5 



Class Notes 



1997 

Lori Whitney writes, "1 recently moved 
back to Maine to be closer to my family. 
It has been quite an adjustment after 
living near Boston for 14 years, but I am 
very happy to have my own house with 
a big yard! 1 also made a big career 
change and am currently working for 
Bank of America as a customer service 



2000'S 

2000 

Meredith Byam Miller realized that 
her talent in fashion design was in 
"spotting, recognizing, and forecasting 
fashion trends," which eventually led 
her into the consignment business. 
A few years ago she opened her own 
shop. Poor Little Rich Girl, in Davis 
Square, Somerville. Her style is "quirky, 
eclectic, and fun-loving." In 2006 she 
took a second big leap and moved into 
larger quarters. 



Class 0/2001 




The union of Heidi Lewis-Smith 
and Brian Smith '02 produced 
daughter, Reese Kathleen, horn 
on November zg, zooj. 



2002 

Tangi Pina started a business in which 
she personalizes children's books. Says 
Tangi, "The books make unique baby 
gifts or birthday and holiday gifts for 
children up through age 12." Check out 
Tangi's website: www.iseeme.com. 



Class of 2002 
I 

Two fiends are enjoying motherhood. 
(L to R) Tangi Pina with daughter, 
Madison, andjenn Benton Hunter 
with son, Landon. 




Gus Batista joined Nissan North 
America, Inc. as the southeast regional 
fixed operations manager for the 
Miami/ West Palm district. He lives in 
Miami Beach. 

Kellee Cormier Miller accepted the 
position of Lasell College Director 
of The Holway Child Study Center at 
the Barn. 

Ben Gomez is counsel for Washington 
Square Financial in Boca Raton, FL. 

2003 

Karina Fontanez married Phillip 
Holmes on August 18, 2007 at the 
Devens Common Center in Fort 
Devens, MA. She says, "We had a 
wonderful celebration with our family 
and friends." 



Class of 200^ 




Karina Fontanez and Phillip Holmes. 



Betsy Chominski received an MBA from 
the Simmons School of Management in 

August '07. 

Ami Ruehrwein got a promotion and is 
now a contemporary marketing team 
leader. She reports, "I cut down my 
accounts to my top five and help 
oversee a team of seven. I do 
scheduling, set up bigger events, 
approve expense reports, order all 
promotional products, and help my boss 
with big projects." In other news. Ami 
and Troy Wall '05 got a Boston Terrier 
named Tessie and are buying a house in 
Wakefield, MA. 



Class of 2002 




2004 

Amy Sprague Sundberg writes, "I 

recently tied the knot on the popular 
date of 7/7/07. Two of my bridesmaids 
were Mary Pat Smyth and Bekah 
Levine." 



Class of 2004 



1 





Amy Sprague Sundberg and her 
husband, Soren. 



Jackie Wong married Kirk Yeomans 
on June 9, 2007 at the Lighthouse Inn 
in New London, CT. Jackie says, "My 
maid of honor was my best friend, 
Wendy Chan." 



Class of 2004 




Theresa Ashe Capasso exclaims, "Yes, 
twins! Joseph Donato and Isabella 
Rose were bom November 7, 2006." 



Jaclyn Wong Yeomans and her 
husband. Kirk. 



According to Tanya Barbosa Gallagher 
who married Michael Gallagher in June, 
the following Lasell grads attended their 
wedding: Chris Hickey, Matthew 
Hutchinson '03, Diana Maiato, Michael 
Norton '03, and Matthew Staley '03. 
Tanya and Mike bought a house in 
Sharon in October. Tanya is working at 
a sports and physical therapy clinic in 
Wellesley and is an athletic trainer at 
the Dover-Sherborn High School. 
Mike is working as a crane operator 
in Pembroke and owns his own tree 
service business. 

About four years ago, Betsy Bezanson 
Fife moved to Orlando. She writes, 
"I love it here. My husband and I just 
purchased a home in Avalon Park. I am 
employed as the advertising manager 
for Ashley Furniture. I would love to 
hear from any long-lost friends. 
Go Red Sox!" 



Our sincere condolences to Emily Bird 
on the death of her grandmother, Jean 
Allen Bird '38, in August. 

Crystal Crafts Rivera is a buyer for a 
lingerie store in Northampton MA. She 
returned to work full-time about four 
weeks after the birth of her daughter. 
Crystal says, "It was quite a juggling act 
in the beginning, but everyone has 
adapted well — my boss, my daughter, 
and me." 

James Martin is a clothing designer 
in Natidc, MA. He recently opened 
up his owTi business called Filthy 
Laundry. Check out his website: 
filthylaundryliving.com. James is 
living in Newton, about two miles 
away from Lasell. 

2006 

Beth D'Esopo is studying for a 
Masters degree in Criminal Justice 
at Suffolk University. 

Holly Jobbagy accepted a position as a 
public relations account coordinator 
with the firm of Kel & Partners. Holly 
says, "I am excited to begin, and it is 
only 14 minutes from my apartment 
in Framingham." 

2007 

Mercedes Garcia-Bancroft writes, "I 
thought I would share my excitement. 
I am running for Miss Massachusetts 
International 2008." In her spare time, 
Mercedes is working towards a Master's 
degree in Management with a 
marketing concentration in Lasell's 
graduate program. 

Greg Lillibridge, a trainer with 
Mulrenan Physical Therapy, will lead 
both the athletic training and injury 
management programs at Austin 
Preparatory School. He will be 
responsible for the assessment and 
management of on-field injuries for the 
more than 300 student athletes. 

Chris Roy accepted the position of data 
coordinator for Suffolk University in 
Boston. He is living in Newton. 



Upcoming Alumni Events 



If you are interested in sponsoring 
or helping to organize an alumni 
event in the future, please contact 
the Alumni Relations Office, 
1844 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Newton, MA 02466-2716, 
617-243-2139, 
617-243-2467 or 
alumni@iasell.edu. 



16 



Lasell Class Notes 



Spring 2008 



class Notes 



not^3ene 



Engagements 

Joanna Winslow 'oi to Jessie Rae 
Ami Ruehrwein '03 to Troy Wall '05 
Tiziana Buddie '04 to Ronald Mayberry 
Andrea Kimball '04 to Joshua Roman 
Troy Wall '05 to Ami Ruehrwein '03 

Marriages 

Jackie Hoffineier Lard '68 to 

David Lee on December 29, 2006 

Amy Kohut '95 to Corey Farina 
on June 2, 2007 

Deborah Johns '97 to Dr. Victor 
Freeman on September 29, 2007 

Carissa Templeton '98 to Kurt Tondorf 
on September 14, 2007 

Karif Cortiella '02 to Elmira Kamerbayeva 

Jarrod VanDerwerken '02 to Stacey 
Pollock on September 29, 2007 

Karina Fontanez '03 to Phillip Holmes 
on August 18, 2007 

Katrina Hester '03 to Dwayne Antonio 
on June 27, 2007 

Tanya Barbosa '04 to Michael 
Gallagher '04 on June 2, 2007 

Betsy Bezanson '04 to Richard Fife 
in August 25, 2006 

Crystal Crafts '04 to Gabriel Rivera 
on May 19, 2006 

Lela D'Andrea '04 to Glen Dalton 
on June 8, 2007 

Michael Gallagher '04 to Tanya 
Barbosa '04 on June 2, 2007 

Amy Pilat '04 to Michael Weksner 
on June 23, 2007 

Amy Sprague '04 to Soren Sundberg 
on July 7, 2007 

Jennifer Toscano '04 to Karl Seibert 
on August 4, 2007 

Lyndsay Moore '06 to Michael 
Fortunato on October 27, 2007 

Sylvie Norian '06 to EmU Yeghiaian 
on July 7, 2007 



Births 

Debra Ayube Glass '90, a daughter, 
Katherine Elyse, on December 26, 2006 

Kerry Brody Barber '95, a daughter, 
Isabella Anne, on August 7, 2007 

Carla DiNatale Smith '97, twins, 
Sofia Rose and Caleb Ethan, 
on October 3, 2007 

Nicole Houdelette Ragognetti '99, 

a son, Alexander John, on July 13, 2007 

Jennifer Benton Hunter '01, a son, 
Landon Edward, April 23, 2007 

Heidi Lewis-Smith '01, a daughter, 
Reese Kathleen, on November 29, 2007 

Ben Gomez '02, a daughter, 
Olivia Hannah, June i, 2007 

Tangi Pina '02, a daughter, 
Madison Olivia, on May 30, 2007 

Brian Smith '02, a daughter, 

Reese Kathleen, on November 29, 2007 

Crystal Crafts Rivera '04, a daughter, 
Lola-Marie, on September 11, 2007 



Deaths 

Elizabeth Stahl Mott '28 

on October 16, 2007 

Maude Williams Helgesen '29 

on May 24, 2007 

Ruth Gerry Means '31 

on January 3, 2008 

Gertrude Homer Mosher '32 

on January 2, 2008 

Dorothy Foss True '33 

on December 5, 2007 

Mary Shiveley Hiss '33 

on January 20, 2008 

Jane Spear '33 

Alice Floyd Rice '34 

on July 19, 2007 

Kay Peck Dietler '35 

on October 20, 2007 

Barbara Young Leach '35 

on September 23, 2007 

Margaret "Peggy" Walsh '35 

on December 7, 2007 

Emily Hubbel Weiss '36 

on February 23, 2008 



Ruth Keyes Murdaugh '36 

on June 12, 2007 

Audrey Smith Henderson '36 

on September 9, 2007 

Florence Stetson Pipes '37 

Jean Allen Bird '38 

on August 19, 2007 

Elizabeth Clark Brighton '38 

on January 27, 2007 

Eleanor Dresser Gross '38 
Ada Epstein Hirschman '38 

Mary Ann Fishering Feuling '38 

on December 3, 2007 

Martha Hume Worth '38 
Barbara Jeppesen Thomann '38 

Trithena McFarland Argo '38 

on July 17, 2007 

Ruth McLean Collins '38 
Ruth Meighan Gillette '38 
Mary Rabus Reiber '38 

Martha Romaine Jones '38 

on August 17, 2006 

Jane Sherman O'Brien '38 
Audrey Spiller Smalley '38 
Carolyn Stuart Drange '38 

Eleanor Swett Richards '38 

on February 23, 2002 

Roma Wilson Lhowe '38 

Jean Adams '40 

on December 23, 2007 

Euphemia Burr Gardner '40 

on May 27, 2007 

Elizabeth Jewett Porter '40 

on September 14, 2006 

Virginia Purinton Smith '40 

on March 17, 2007 

Madelyne "Honey" Rose Browne '40 

on November 13, 2007 

Luceal Welsh Berni '40 

on December 26, 2007 

Marjorie Williams Eddy '40 

Dorothy Walker Hughes '41 

in June 2005 

Doris Leach Almeida '42 

on August I, 2007 



Phyllis Nelson Anderson '42 

on October 17, 2007 

Ruth Anson Drayer '43 

on January i, 2007 

Cynthia Austin Sharp '43 

on May 10, 2007 

Jean Brock Stone '43 
Nancy Campbell Coffin '43 

Jean Dewar Warren '43 

on November 4, 2007 

Jessie Mackenzie FuUer '43 

on July 30, 2007 

Dorothy Rosien Roberts '43 
Barbara Smith Babbitt '43 

Mary Keating Anderson '44 

on November 30, 2007 

Rachael Kellogg '44 

on September 28, 2007 

Ann Scott Peal '44 

on April 18, 2007 

Florence Loizeaux Ritchie '45 

in June 2007 

Corinne Schlegel Norris '46 

on February 8, 2008 

Frances Burns McSweeney '47 

on February 2, 2008 

Jane Carl Turner '47 

on October 6, 2007 

Carolyn Huntley Gentles '47 

on June 29, 2007 

Shirley Bonnell Doe '48 

on October 14, 2007 

Nancy Cummings Jenkins '48 
Leona Karski Sweatt '48 

Martha Kennedy Ingersoll '48 

on November 23, 2007 

Barbara Newkirk Metzger '48 

Marjorie "Marge" Boynton Anderson '49 

on April 12, 2006 

Virginia "Ginny" Byrnes Fischer '49 

on November 17, 2007 

Diane Heath Beever '49 

on October 5, 2007 

Carlene Humphrey Hopkins '49 

on October 31, 2007 

Carolyn Loewe Jones '49 

on October 11, 2007 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Class Notes 17 






Class Notes 



llot^Sene 



Joan Stowe Pedersen '49 

on August 22, 2006 

Margaret Barton '51 

Bette Clark Mott '52 

on October 7, 2007 

Gail Middleton Wolber '53 

on July 13, 2007 

Doreen Allen Wiggins '58 

on June 2, 2007 

Nancy Maloney Coyle '58 

Starr Tupper Shannon '58 

on January 15, 2008 

Linda Patterson GifFord '60 

Elizabeth "Betsy" Howard Crosbie '61 

on February 24, 2008 

Mary Golden Michaud '62 

on September 27, 2007 

Ellen Signorelli Johnson '62 

on November 8, 2007 

Martha Sweetser Wright '66 

on October 3, 2006 

Beverly Johnston Jenkins '68 

on July 15, 2007 

Susan Hartsig Lek '69 

on October 2, 2007 

Martha Schwartz '70 
Margaret Buckley '71 

Mary Ellen Miller '73 

on December 30, 2007 

Nancy Ahlheim Stanton '78 

Muriel Sheppard, former faculty, 

August 12, 2007 

Kevin Tyska, former lacrosse coach and 
admission counselor, January 21, 2007 



Leonard Wolfe, Friend and Heritage 
Society Member, husband of the late Jane 
Mehaffey Wolfe '44, and son of 
the late Priscilla Alden Wolfe '19, 
December 31, 2007 



EHzabeth Stahl Mott '28 passed away 
on her looth birthday. She was still 
enjoying every day and was looking 
forward to a party in her honor. She was 
a loyal Lasell alumna throughout her 
long life. 

James Howard Remley passed away 
on November i, 2007 at the age of 95. 
His entire career was devoted to music 
education and Lasell was fortunate to 
have him as the conductor of the 
Orphean Club for many years. He 
inspired students with his charisma 
and passion and his daughter Sally 
Remley Southmayd '62 and her 
husband William named the stage in 
the Yamawaki Art and Cultural Center 
in his honor during the Lasdl 1^0 
Campaign. He will long be remembered 
for his commitment to music. 

Kevin A Tyska passed away 
unexpectedly on January 21, 2008. 
He came to Lasell in 1998 and was 
the first head coach of the College's 
men's lacrosse program. He had an 
enormous influence on his players, was 
a hard worker and a dedicated coach. 
"He loved his student-athletes and 
demanded the best from them," says 
Lasell Athletic Director Kristy Walter. 
"He laid the foundation for the 
successful program that we now have. 
He will be missed by everyone who 
knew him." 



Sadly, Overseer Duane V. "Joe" 
Wedeman passed away on September 
28, 2007. The husband of Harriet 
Markham Wedeman '48, the two were 
very involved in the Lasell community. 
They made a leadership gift to the Lasell 
150 Campaign to establish the Harriet 
Markham Wedeman Endowed 
Scholarship and to support the Winslow 
Hall Renovation Project. Both were 
involved in the arts and in 2002 the 
Wedeman Art Gallery was dedicated to 
them. Joe was an accomplished poet 
and his words moved those who were 
able to attend his funeral. 



Requiem Poem 



The glow of wealth and fame 

Embrace but few 

Fame is only fleeting 

While memories of loyalty 

Withstand the warp of time. 

When you depart this earth 

A ballot count on judgment day 

Need only say 

You passed this way 

And took your turn to watch. 

(Published in "Tlie Coming of Dawn" National 
Library of Poetry, Library of Congress, 7993J 

D.V. WEDEMAN 



Navajo Boy 



My humble hogan once shamed me 

My confounded youth sought city life 

Silent books cried out to me, I came 

Talk without truth mocked me, I cried 

My rivers were made of concrete, my sky of smoke 

Of noise my ear is bruised, my brain is addled 

I longed for truth in the bleat of sheep 

The song of the mockingbird 

In our native tongue "Ya Te He" again to my father 

My hogan is now my castle 

A happy hunting ground once more is mine 

I shall wander no more. 

{1994) 

D.V. WEDEMAN 



18 



Lasell Class Notes 



Spring 2008 



Campus updat 



Facu Ity/StafF U pdate 





chair of the 
Communication 
Department 
Janice Barrett, 

Ed.D., is serving 
as one of four 
reviewers 
nationwide for the 
Fulbright Commission's current cycle of 
appUcants. At the National 
Communication Association's annual 
convention in Chicago, the 
Commimication professors in 
attendance from across the country 
elected Dr. Barrett to the position of 
Vice Chair of the Conflict Resolution 
and Peace Division and Program 
Planner for the 2008 convention in 
San Diego. 

Associate Fashion 
Professor Jill 
Carey worked on a 
special project 
with two students 
researching 
women's military 
uniforms between 
WWI and the Vietnam era for a 
permanent exhibit housed on the USS 
Massachusetts at Battleship Cove in Fall 
River, MA. The exhibit opened in March 
and was titled "Female Faces of War." 

a Assistant Professor 
of Communication 
Jennifer Chakroff, 
Ph.D. will present a 
paper on mitigating 
the unintended 
effects of advertising 
on young children 
in Montreal, Canada at the annual 
conference of the International 
Communication Association. She 
has also co-authored an article on 
newspaper coverage of intimate partner 
violence that is to be published in the 
Journal of Communication. 

Assistant 
Professor of 
Environmental 
Science Michael 
Daley, Ph.D. has 
been awarded two 
Putnam Family 
Faculty 
Development Fund Grants this 
academic year: in Spring 2008 for the 
restructuring of Science for Educators II 
(SCI104) and in Fall 2007 for a 
connected learning project for Global 
Ecology (SCI211). He has authored 
several books on eastern hemlock 
water use. 




f Director of 

Technology for 
the RoseMary B. 
Fuss Technology 
for Learning 
Center and 
Assistant 
Professor of Computer and Information 
Science Richard Dodds made a 
presentation at Framingham State 
College's Conference on e-Portfolio 
in Higher Education: Applications 
in Academic Technology and 
Learning Outcomes which was titled 
Discussion and Review of e-Portfolio 
Software Solutions. 

KeUee MiUer '02 

has been 
appointed 
Director of the 
Holway Child 
Study Center at 
the Bam. She has 
served as Interim 
Director of the Bam since 2007 and will 
begin work on a Master of Education 
degree this fall. 

Marilyn Negip has 
been appointed 
l\^K -^ ^^^H Director of the 
i(^V l^^^H Brennan Library. 
She joined Lasell 
in January 2006 
as Reference 
Librarian/ 
Archivist. Prior to that, she was the 
Library Director at Justin-Siena High 
School in Napa, CA. She holds a Master 
of Library Science degree from San Jose 
State University. 







Professor of 
Biology Stephen 
Sarikas, Ph.D. has 
been on sabbatical 
for the spring 
semester to work 
on the second 
edition of his lab 
manual. Laboratory Investigations in 
Anatomy e[ Physiology, published by 
Pearson Benjamin Cummings. It is due 
out in January, 2009. 

Director of the 
RoseMary B. Fuss 
Center for 
Research on 
Aging and 
Intergenerational 
Studies and Dean 
of Graduate and 
Professional Studies Mark Sciegaj, 
Ph.D. was the plenary speaker at the 
Arizona Health Care Cost Containment 
System State Case Managers Annual 
Meeting. The title of his talk was 
Facilitating the Paradigm Shift fi-om Case 
Management to Consumer Directed Care. 
In The Journal on Aging and Social Policy 
he co-authored an article on state 
experiences with implementing the cash 
and counseling demonstration and 
evaluation project. 

Barbara (Bobbie) 
Sproat has been 
appointed 
Reference 
Librarian/ 
Archivist at 
Brennan Library. 
1^ it . . -■ .. fJk'i. k She has worked as 
a reference librarian at both Lasell and 
Simmons College and has worked in 
the archives of the National Textile 
History Museum. 




Lasell Village Rededication 




College Receives 
$125,000 Alden Trust 
Grant to Continue 
Campus-Wide 
Wireless Access 



Lasell College received a $125,000 
grant from the George I. Alden 
Trust in Worcester, MA recently to 
help further develop a w/ireless 
campus at the College along with 
the educational venues of Lasell 
Village. The receipt of the grant was 
announced jointly by Ruth Shuman, 
dean for Institutional Advancement 
and Deborah Gelch, Chief 
Information Officer. The two 
worked together to create the 
grant-yielding proposal. 

The proposal titled "Connected 
Student Experience at Lasell 
College" requested funds to provide 
the resources necessary to increase 
the coverage of Lasell's wireless 
campus from 5% to 55% over the 
next few months. 

"With this grant, wireless access 
will be added to some residence 
halls, classrooms, and public 
spaces," explains Dean Shuman. 
"As the College's enrollment 
continues to increase, transforming 
unused or public space into new 
learning venues continues to be a 
key strategy in meeting the 
challenge of managing this growth." 

"Over the years, Alden Trust has 
been instrumental in helping the 
College build the technology 
infrastructure to support Lasell's 
educational mission while 
maintaining a competitive edge. 
We are excited to be able to 
continue our long-standing 
relationship with Alden Trust," 
says Deborah Gelch. ¥ 




«» 



Honorees at the Village ribbon cutting this past fall for the reopening of the newly renovated 
Pete's Store and Margaret's Cafe were (L to R) President Tom de Witt, Margaret Ward, and 
former College Trustee and Chairman of the Board of Lasell Village Osier "Pete" Peterson. 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves I Q 



Campus Update 



Lasell's Steven Bloom Pens Student Companion to 
Eugene O'Neill 



r or Steven F. Bloom, Lasell's dean of 
Undergraduate Education and professor 
of English, the celebrated American 
playwright Eugene O'Neill has become 
almost like family. In the preface to his 
latest O'Neill analysis — a hardcover 
book called Student Cotnpanion to 
Eugene O'Neill (Greenwood Press), on 
Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 
— Steve thanks his wife and children 
"for making room for O'Neill at our 
dinner table." 

Indeed, the brooding dramatist who 
won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 
1936. and wTote more than 50 plays 
including a number he never completed 
to his satisfaction and destroyed, has ""*'" 
been a steadfast companion to Steve, 
who has built a reputation as an astute, 
insightful and dedicated O'Neill scholar. 

Steven Bloom has published numerous 
articles and reviews on O'Neill, and has 
spoken about the storied theatrical 
craftsman — considered America's 
greatest dramatist — at many 
professional conferences and other 
public forums. He has also completed 
his two-year term (2006-2007) ^s the 
president of the Eugene O'Neill Society 
and has been a member of the Society's 
Board of Directors since 2000. He 
knows the playwright and his work 
inside out. 

It is why Steve was invited to write the 
book on O'Neill — one of a series on 
classic writers designed as a library 
resource for students in high school 
and college. 



Steven Bloom says that "for all of his 
importance, Eugene O'Neill is not 
terribly well knowTi by young people 
these days, unless perhaps they have a 
particular interest in theatre. American 
playwrights more commonly studied in 
high schools are Thornton Wilder, 
Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller. 

"I think high school teachers have 
tended to stay away from O'Neill 
because he has the reputation of writing 
long and depressing plays and his work 
seems to be a little less accessible." But, 
as he says in his new book, "many of 
these works will, in fact, reward further 
study, especially when considered, as all 
, dramatic literature should be, with an 
eye toward their theatricality." , 

Even in college, American drama is 
often thought of as the step-child of .j^y- 
American literature, and O'Neill is, 
therefore, inadequately represented in 
American literature course syllabi. 
Professor Bloom reports that the 
Eugene O'Neill Society, which promotes 
the study of O'Neills life and works, 
supports increased acknowledgment 
of the playwright's status in more 
American literature curricula, both in 
high schools and colleges. 

"It's unfortunate," he says, "that such an 
important figure in American literature 
has been underappreciated. But then, 
except for Shakespeare, drama has 
traditionally been somewhat less highly 
regarded by literature professors tha: 
fiction or poetry. Maybe it's Because 
Irama, which requires theatrical 




T U D E N T CO M 



Eugene O'Neill 






production and performance, is more 
of a collaborative art form than other 

literary genres." 

Next on Professor Bloom's professional 
horizon is presenting a paper at the 7th 
International O'Neill Conference in 
California this June on prime time 
O'Neill. He vvill cover how the 
playwright's work has paved the way for 
the treatment of alcoholism and drug 
addiction in movies and TV. « 




Legal Representation for Those Denied Just Treatment 

Rebecca Kiley Talks of a Justice System in Crisis 



Our death penalty system is in 
crisis and we are sentencing 
juveniles to life sentences," said 
Rebecca Kiley as she spoke to 
students and faculty at Lasell. She is 
a staff attorney for the Equal Justice 
Initiative (EJI) of Alabama, a private, 
nonprofit organization that provides 
legal representation to indigent 
defendants and to prisoners who 
have been denied fair and just 
treatment in the legal system. 

"The United States has the highest 
rate of incarceration in the world," 
explained Kiley. In Alabama, there 
are more inmates per capita on 
death row than any other state and 
it has an unusual justice system. It 
is one of eight states that holds 



partisan elections for its courts, thereby 
making judges very conscious of voter 
opinion in election years. 

"Race plays a huge role in this state," 
continued Kiley. "While 65 percent 
of victims are Afro-Americans, this 
community is not represented on 
the juries. Furthermore, there is a weak 
public defender system. The accused 
are represented by attorneys who 
are selected by a lottery system. 
Under these circumstances, it is not 
surprising that more blacks are 
convicted and executed." 

EJI provides legal representation and 
assistance to dozens on death row in 
Alabama and challenges the unreliable 
use of capital punishment across the 



U.S. It also provides legal aid to those 
who have been wrongly convicted or 
sentenced to life imprisonment without 
the possibility of parole. 

■The prosecution of the underaged is a 
further concern of EJI. "We have a 
number of 13- and 14-year-old clients 
and we are challenging their convictions 
and sentences. Sending juveniles to 
adult prison is a process that is uniquely 
American. These young people are 
not developed in a lot of ways, are 
susceptible to peer pressure, and have 
less of an abihty to assess risks," 
said Kiley. 

"We should look at our treatment of this 
age group and ask what it means for us 
as a society. EJI advocates for change 




Two students 
Receive Special 
Recognition 



Ashlyn Chesney '09 

from Hampden, 
Maine was one of 
12 people selected 
out of a pool 
of over 1000 
contestants by a 
panel of industry experts to appear 
in Lord and Taylor's 2009 Spring 
Campaign. She and the other eleven 
finalists of the 2008 Lord and Taylor 
Model Search traveled to New York 
where she and a young man from 
Virginia were named the winners. 
All 12 finalists participated with 
seasoned New York models in a 
Fashion Show at the store's flagship 
on Fifth Avenue. The event was 
hosted by TV personality Robert 
Verdi and the judges included 
supermodel-actress Carol Alt and 
David Lipman, chairman of LIPMAN, 
the advertising agency responsible for 
Lord and Taylor's much talked about 
$10 million branding campaign. 

Laura Notarangelo 

'09 received $iooo 
for her winning 
essay in a national 
competition 
sponsored by 
"Outside the 
Classroom: Alternative Spring 
Break." Her Honors Seminar titled 
"AIDS in America," through which 
"I learned the facts on this rampant 
virus," inspired a trip by Laura and 
12 others from Lasell to Chicago 
where they volunteered with Vital 
Bridges in Chicago, a non-profit 
organization that helps people who 
are impacted by HIV and AIDS to 
build healthier lives. 





Rebeca Kiley answers student questions. 

in a system where we do not give 
consideration to the age of tire accused, 
where there is racial discrimination, 
and where the underprivileged are 
not given adequate representation." i' 



2 O Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Campus Update 



Report on Strategic Plan 



In his first few months as the new 
president of Lasell College, Michael 
Alexander was amused to receive the 
same question over and over again from 
any Lasell constituent whom he met, 
whether student, faculty, alumni, 
parent, staffer donor. 

"So," they would say, "What's your 
vision for the College?" 

Michael enjoyed seeing the surprise in 
the faces of his questioners when he 
consistently and resolutely responded 
that he didn't have one — yet! 

"It can't be my vision," he would 
explain. "It must be the vision of the 
whole Lasell Community." 

Michael looked forward to leading a 
collaborative and sustained effort, 
involving the whole Lasell community, 
to advance Lasell's common vision and 
to sustain its momentum for the future. 
His goal was to unite the Lasell 
constituency around two objectives: "to 
continue to strengthen Lasell's position 
and ensure its place of prominence 
among institutions of higher learning." 

In mid- September, two months into his 
presidency, Michael Alexander began 
the process of doing just that. In a 
series of town meetings representing 
each constituency of the College, and an 
intensive three-day strategic planning 
session boasting the participation of key 
representatives from each of those 
constituencies — the new president of 
Lasell facilitated the first round of a 
strategic planning process that has 
defined the College's vision of what it 
will be and what it will look like five 
years hence, in 2012. 




Where 
The Classroom 

Is The 
Real World 



As part of the process, members of the 
Lasell community defined the Mission 
of the College (Lasell College integrates 
challenging coursework with practical 
experience in an environment that 
fosters lifelong intellectual exploration, 
active citizenship and social 
responsibility) and identified the 
core values of the institution: 

• Student focus 

• Innovative education across 
the lifespan 

• Integrity, honesty and ethical 
decision making 

• Social responsibility 



The picture that emerged of Lasell 
College in five years included: 

• 1,600 undergraduate students and 
300 graduate students, with 
two-thirds of all courses taught by 
full-time, permanent faculty. 

• Increased diversity on campus 
including a doubling of 
international students, a 6 percent 
increase in minority students, a 

5 percent increase in male students 
and a substantial increase in 
minorities among the faculty, staff, 
and Board of Trustees. 

• An increase in the retention of first 
year students to at least 75 percent. 

• A growth in the endowment of 
almost double to at least $40 million 
and Annual Fund giving of 

$1 million or more. 

• Four new master's degree 
programs, four service learning 
abroad programs and three new 
athletic programs. 

• Significantly expanded hours of 
critical student services, including 
health and counseling services. 

• More physical space for a growing 
student body and faculty as well as 
the additional staff to support the 
increased size and activity level. 



Additionally, the sttategic plan 
anticipates: 

• Building three additional residence 
halls in the next five years — the 
College has already begun design 
and approval work on two residential 
halls, which will be located on 
Woodland Road. 

• The need to build or renovate space 
for offices and classrooms and 
expand the athletic facilities. 



" The Lasell vision is glued together 
by the application of a consistent 
educational philosophy, applied 
across all academic programs," 
says President Alexander. "Our 
connected learning approach to 
teaching brings the real world 
right into the classroom, where 
students work closely with faculty 
in a problem-based and project- 
based approach, where students 
get to practice the work of the 
academic subject matter, 
preparing them for the day when 
they must compete for jobs, adapt 
to an ever-changing economy, 
encounter diverse peoples and 
cultures and grapple with 
ethical questions. i 

— President Alexander 



For a closeup look at the strategic plan in detail, please go to 
www.lasell.edu/images/userlmages/fweil/Page_715/Strategic%20Plan_final.pdf 



Lasell to Host First International Conference May 19-23 

Aging: Families and Households in Global Perspective 




I he RoseMary B. Fuss Center for 
Research on Aging and International 
Studies and the Donahue Institute 
for Values and Public Life are hosting 
the annual conference for the 
Committee on Family Research 
(CFR) of the International 
Sociological Association from May 
19- 23. The conference is titled 
"Aging: Families and Households in 
Global Perspective." 

"We are excited to have a 
distinguished group of scholars 
coming from around the world to the 
Lasell campus," says Center Director 



Mark Sciegaj, Ph.D., who is also Dean 
of Graduate and Professional Studies. 
"Participants are coming from as far 
away as China, India, and the Middle 
East to hear our keynote speakers and to 
share their research." 

Tessa LeRoux, Ph.D., Associate 
Professor in Sociology and Director 
of the Donahue Institute, who is 
organizing the conference with Mark 
Sciegaj, has been a member of the CFR 
for many years and has presented 
papers and organized sessions for this 
conference in places as far afield as 
South Africa, Mexico, and Canada. "I 



am thrilled that we are able to put Lasell 
on the international academic map by 
having this distinguished group of 
researchers on our campus," she says. 

Conference highlights include: 

• May 19: Talk and exhibit of 
photographs of supercentenarians 
by Jerry Friedman, Chairman, 
Earth's Elders Foundation, Inc. 

• May 20: Plenary keynote address by 
Merril Silverstein, Ph.D., Professor 
of Gerontology and Sociology, Family 



and Intergenerational Relations at 
the University of South California 
Davis School of Gerontology. 

• May 21: Panel discussion with 
Dr. Irene Levin from the University 
of Oslo, Simmons Professor Sophie 
Freud, granddaughter of Sigmund, 
and Lasell Villagers Dr. Freddy 
Frankel and Dr. Margery Silver. 

For further information, please contact 
Dr. Mark Sciegaj at 617-663-7006 or 
Dr. Tessa LeRoux at 617- 243-2104. W 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 21 



Campus Update 



Effects of Climate Change 

Kurt Olson of Carbon Coalition 
Addresses Students 



Green is the Way to Co 

Reducing Our Carbon Footprint 



I am passionate about environmental 
issues because of my four-year-old son," 
says Kurt Olson, who is a professor at 
the Massachusetts School of Law (MSL) 
and a vohmteer with the Carbon 
Coalition. "I want to say I took positive 
steps when he asks me what I tried to 
do when I found out that global 
wanning would drastically affect the 
planet — and tliat means more than 
switching my light bulbs over from 
incandescent to fluorescent." 

As part of his job at MSL, Olson speaks 
about the environment. He also hosts 
cable television programs and did a 
show on die Arctic Climate Impact 
Assessment. He used some of his 




Professor Nancy Waldron and Professor 
Kurt Olson. 



findings when he spoke at Lasell at the 
request of Marketing Professor Nancy 
Waldron and her Consumer Behavior 
and Global Marketing classes. The 
students brought him to campus as 
part of their research on global warming 
and the role played by consumers 
and/or businesses. 

"Our children are going to inherit a 
completely different world than what we 
have today," he says. "In the last three 
years, 23 percent of our sea ice has 
melted and, at this rate, by 2030 the 
North Pole ice will completely 
disappear. As the ice melts, there will be 
more warming because the dark ocean 
will absorb the heat from the sun." 

Olson was careful to point out that 
climate is different from weather. "The 
trend is towards more extreme events," 
he explains. "We are seeing a 
widespread change in precipitation, heat 
waves and, with warmer oceans, there is 
a tendency for more hurricanes to form. 
Another trend is the emergence of new 
diseases. There are mosquitoes now in 
places they weren't before and they are 
moving north. 

"We need to act locally and think 
globally," he warns. "This is the biggest 
challenge to face mankind and if we 
don't take steps we are engaging in 
criminally irresponsible behavior." '^ 



There is a new energy on campus 
around the efforts to deal with climate 
change. The Green Task Force, whose 
purpose is to assess the feasibility of 
and to recommend concrete actions 
regarding, a comprehensive Green 
Campus Campaign, has been hard at 
work looking at ways to minimize the 
Lasell carbon footprint. This initiative 
formed the impetus for a number of 
related programs sponsored by the 
Donahue Institute aimed at raising 
awareness of this challenging issue 
on campus. 

On January 31, Lasell participated with 
more than 1000 universities, colleges, 
and schools across the country in a 
campaign called Focus the Nation. 
Faculty, students and staff responded to 
the challenge to walk, carpool or use 
public transportation. The College 
joined in a national interactive webcast 
and in a national vote to prioritize 
solutions. Many faculty members 
participated in a "teach-in," discussing 
climate change in the context of their 
subject matter. 

On February 23, Lasell was honored to 
host Lester Brown, Director of the Earth 
Policy Institute in Washington, DC. 
This event was co-sponsored by the 
Population Connection and the 
Donahue Institute. Mary Barbara 
Alexander is on the Board of the 




Lester Brown of the Earth Policy Institute 
explains his plan for action to a Hamel 
House audience. 



Population Connection, an organization 
that works closely with the Earth Policy 
Institute, and it was exciting to have a 
large number of visitors from all over 
Massachusetts join us to hear Browrf s 
views on a plan for action. 

In Brown's latest book. Plan B }.o: 
Mobilizing to Save Civilization, he sets 
out the challenges facing the planet as 
well as solutions. These include cutting 
carbon emissions by 80 percent by the 
year 2020, eradicating poverty, limiting 
population growth, and planting many 
millions of trees, e 



Six Degrees of Separation 

Two Board Members Discover A Shared Past 




(L to RjMartha Franke, Herman Franke, Joan Hoffmeier, and Gertrude 
Hoffmeier stand in front of the Massey house. In front are (L to R) Jackie 
Hoffmeier and a shy Judy Hoffmeier. 



I didn't know the name of the man I 
was seated next to at the October Board 
Dinner," recalls Overseer Jackie Hoffmeier 
Lee '68, "but if I had, 1 would have 
recognized it immediately!" 

During individual introductions, the two 
asked each other where they had grown up 
and discovered that they were both from 
New jersey. 

"Whattown.^" asked the man. 

"Hackensack," I replied, "and I saw a look 
of increased interest cross his face." 

"What street?" he continued. 

"74 Sussex Street," I blurted out. 

"That's it, that's my grandparents' house!" 
he exclaimed. 



"I thought he must have misunderstood 
what I said, but when he told me his name 
was Dwight Massey I realized there had 
been no mistake because I remember his 
grandmother, Mrs. Massey, very well." 

Jackie's grandparents, Martha and Herman 
Franke, had rented the house from the 
Masseys for 40 years, finally purchasing it 
in 1968. Sadly, it has now been torn down. 

When Jackie returned home after the board 
meeting she went through her memorabilia 
and discovered her parents' wedding guest 
book with Dwight's grandparents' 
signatures in it as well as old photos of 74 
Sussex Street which she copied and sent 
off to the Masseys. 

"It is truly a small world," says Jackie. "I 
have such a strong recollection of Dwight's 
grandmother, the house, and the people in 
the neighborhood. For both of us it has 
been a trip down memory lane." it 



2 2 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Campus Update 



Luminaries At Lasell 




Democratic Congressman Barney Frank speaks to President 
Michael Alexander and Mrs. Alexander before addressing 
the Lasell community on the topic of the economic effects 
of Iraq. "Without the war we would have much more 
jlexihility in dealing with the recession and with the 
current health care crisis, " he said. 




Democratic Senator John Kerry visited Lasell Village 
the day before the Massachusetts primary and voiced his 
support for Barack Obama. Also speaking were (L to R) 
Democratic Congresswoman from Pennsylvania Ally son 
Schwartz, Massachusetts Democratic Congressman 
William Delahunt, and Democratic Massachusetts State 
Representative Kay Kahn. The two women spoke in 
support of Hillary Clinton. 




After the Red Sox won the series, rookie hero Jacoby Ellsbury 
spoke to a cheering crowd in de Witt Hall. Members of 
Student Government got to visit with him afterwards. 
(L to R) Director of Student Activities and Orientation C. 
Chad Argotsinger, Kristen Nobel 'lo, Maura Merullo 'jo, 
Jacoby Ellsbury, Allyson Stanczyk 'lo, Christy Cerreta '08, 
Andrew Civetti '10, and Amanda Miller 'og. 




"Spygate" and steroids are just a few of the topics on which 
Boston Globe Sports Columnist and Associate Editor Dan 
Shaughnessy has written opinion pieces. He spoke about 
ethics in the sports world to an engrossed Lasell audience 
at the invitation of the Donahue Institute and the 
Communication, Sports Management, and Athletic 
Departments. (L to R) Athletic Director Kristy Walter, 
Communication Department Chair Janice Barrett, 
Globe Columnist Dan Shaughnessy, Sport Management 
Department Chair William Nowlan, President Michael B. 
Alexander, Donahue Institute Director Tessa LeRoux, and 
Professor Marie Franklin. 



Learning New Tricks 

The Busy Life of a Lasell Graduate Certificate Student 



Jo-Edith Heffron, a volunteer pet 
therapist who, along with her four 
diminutive PapUlion dogs, makes over 
600 visits annually to local nursing 
homes and assisted-living facilities. 
Heffron serves as a volunteer chief 
executive officer of The Pets & People 
Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit 
organization that coordinates pet 
assisted therapy to residential health 
care facilities throughout eastern 
Massachusetts. She is also the treasurer 
for The Community Friends for Human 
Services, a volunteer organization which 
provides services to geriatrics and 
physically and mentally disabled clients 
within the Commonwealth of MA. 
Additionally, Heffron serves on the 
MS PC A Board of Overseers and the 
Newton Pride Committee. 

Oh, and her day job is chief financial 
officer at a Cambridge, MA based 
computer company. "I also have two 
grown chOdren, three grandchildren 
and a pond full offish in my backyard," 
says the energetic Heffron with a laugh. 



In the past few years, amidst all this 
activity, Heffron managed to complete a 
graduate certificate in elder care 
administration at Lasell College. 

"I wanted to broaden my horizons," she 
explains. "The certificate program was 
great, because I was able to do it on a 
part-time basis. The classes are tailored 
to fit the schedule of a working 
professional or for someone who's 
returning to the classroom after a long 
hiatus. The certificate is also a great 
option because you could easily apply it 
toward a master's degree if you decided 
that you wanted to continue." 

For Heffron, however, "the certificate 
program was perfect — it was just what 
I wanted." Looking ahead, she hopes to 
turn her avocation into her vocation and 
enter the elder care field professionally. 
"Elder care is growing so rapidly. 
There's a huge need for qualified people 
to manage a growing number of 
facilities, and I have so much good 
management experience," she notes. 



Heffron reports that she also finds 
working with the elderly to be fulfilling. 
"I've grown so much through 
volunteering. If s such a good feeling 
knowing that the dogs make people's 
lives just a little better." 

Like the other day, when Heffron visited 
a Needham nursing home, "a woman 
saw me, wheeled her chair right over to 
me and started talking to the dogs," she 
recounts. "I had seen this woman before 
on previous visits, but she had never 
spoken to me. In fact, the nurses told 
me that they had never heard her speak. 
Yet on this particular day, she just 
engaged with the dogs. 'Can I come visit 
you again?' I asked her. 'Absolutely,' she 
said. I have to admit, I had tears in my 
eyes," Heffron says. "That's what's so 
powerful about this work." 

At present, Heffron is enrolled in an 
innovative Volunteer Associate Chaplain 
position at Hebrew Senior Life. This 
non denominational program provides 
palliative care and will be an ongoing 




Jo-Edith Heffron, Graduate Certificate 
Recipient 'oy, with two of her Papillion dogs. 

facet at the facility. "This year has been 
one of great learning for me and I've 
found out a lot about my own psyche." 

Heffron will continue with the program 
for another year. « 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 23 



:♦ •-^/ 



VXr' 



Campus Update 



Curator of the Nieman Foundation 
for journalism at Harvard 

Robert Giles Speaks on Ethical 
Dilemmas Faced by the Press 



The practice of journalism today is 
built on such ethical conventions as 
accxiracy, balance, fairness, and the 
pursuit of truth. When the press falls 
short, the public takes note," said 
Robert Giles, airator of Harvard's 
Nieman Foundation for Journalism. 
He was the year's first Donahue 
Institute for Values and Public Life 
speaker and his topic of media ethics 
melded perfectly with the Institute's 
focus on the moral dimensions of 
choices individuals make. His talk was 
also sponsored by Lasell's Department 
of Communication. 

The Nieman Foundation for 
Journalism was founded in 1937 to 
promote and elevate the standards 
of journalism and educate persons 
deemed especially qualified for 
journalism. Each academic year, 
12 American and 12 international 
journalists, who are experienced 
and in mid-career, are awarded 
fellowships. Mr. Giles was himself 
a Nieman Fellow in 1966. 

Over the course of his career, two 
newspapers won Pulitzer Prizes under 
his editorship. The Beacon Journal of 
Akron, OH received the award in 1971 
for its coverage of the shootings at 
Kent State University. The Detroit News 
won in 1994 for the newspaper's 
disclosvires of a scandal in the 
Michigan House Fiscal Agency. 

Mr. Giles has a deep understanding of 
the challenges facing journalism today. 
As he explained, "We live in a complex 
world. In reporting the news of the 
day, the role of a firee and independent 



press is frequently in conflict with other 
values in our constitutional system of 
government such as individual privacy, 
the right to a fair trial, and matters of 
national security." 

In the 20th century an ethical standard 
for journalistic practice began to 
emerge. In the 1970s, Watergate 
made news organizations look within 
and reconsider patterns of behavior 
that included anonymous sources 
and plagiarism. 

More recently, Web sites and blogs have 
exposed instances of unethical writing. 
"Episodes of plagiarism are played out 
in all of their painful details," said Mr. 
Giles. "Unseen bloggers take words 
reporters write and Google them in the 
suspicion that they may not be original. 
And while these hurtful experiences 
mean that journalism's dirty laundry is 
being washed in public, it also means 
that news organizations are tightening 
their ethical practices." 

Another issue Mr. Giles touched on 
was, "The conflict among the press, 
the government and the courts over 
the use by journalists of leaks and 
unnamed sources." He cited instances 
where "the administration has tried to 
control the press but newspapers have 
made principled decisions to publish 
stories the White House has tiled to 
keep quiet." 

Mr. Giles closed with a plea for young 
journalists "to think globally and 
function in a world dominated by 
information, science and technology, 
and the conflicts among cultures." '« 




On the Sidelines at Gillette Stadium 

Lasell Freshman Makes Patriot's 
Cheering Squad 



During a huge blizzard last Saint 
Patrick's Day, Lindsey Barrows '11 
and her dance teacher met in the 
Winchendon, MA Wal-Mart parldng lot 
and headed to Gillette Stadium for the 
New England Patriots cheering squad 
tryouts. "I was only going because my 
teacher didn't want to try out by 
herself" recalls Lindsey. "I'd never 
auditioned before in my life and I had 
no idea what I was in store for. I was 
scared to death. It turned out that there 
were 300 gorgeous girls trying out for 
24 spots! 

"The driving conditions were terrible 
and we arrived a bit late with knots 
in our stomachs. Fortunately the 
Patiiots had extended the tryouts 
because of the storm, but even so we 
got there just in time for the group 
stietch and we were the last to try out 
in front of the judges' panel." 

The day was long and grueling. For 12 
hours Lindsey had to learn new routines 
and go through two cuts, which 
winnowed the group down to 75. Each 
of the remaining contestants then had a 
one-on-one session with the cheering 
coach. "I've never had an interview 
before," Lindsey says. "She put me at 
my ease but it seemed surreal." 

Then it was on to the day's finals. "This 
was the worst part," she exclaims. "We 
had to model in a bathing suit and high 
heels and I have never been in a 
pageant. After that we performed two at 
a time. High kicks, splits, I was doing 
them all." 

At the end of the day, the judges 
narrowed the field down to 30 and each 
finalist was presented with a rose. "I 
couldn't believe that I had made it," 
enthuses Lindsey. "I was totally shocked 
and I couldn't wait to tell my friends, 
'You guys aren't going to believe what 
just happened!'" 

For the next two weeks the 30 finalists 
had to practice at Gillette Stadium. The 
coach was watching to see how they 
picked up material and how they 
worked as a team. At the last practice 
the final cut was made and Lindsey 
discovered that she was on the team. 

"I had never left my town before and 
suddenly everything had changed," 
Lindsey says. She arrived at Lasell in 
September with a lot on her plate, but 




Patriots cheerleader and Lasell student 
Lindsey Barrows '11. 

she seems very able to manage cheering 
for the Patriots with her class work. 
She is a Communication major and 
is thinking of journalism or broadcast 
journalism as a career. 

The whirlwind of the Patiiots' 18-0 
season landed Lindsey in Arizona at 
the Super Bowl. "I was there for five 
days and something incredible 
happened on each of them. For 
instance, another cheerleader and I 
were chosen to do a photo shoot for 
Maxim Online and then we were invited 
to their big party where I found myself 
walking down a red carpet. 

"At the game we were really pumped 
and because we didn't think we were 
going to lose until the final minutes it 
made it doubly hard. But, I have to keep 
reminding myself that it was an 
incredible season. I never in a million 
years thought that I'd be a Patriots 
cheerleader and what a year to start 
with the team." ¥ 



(L to R) Layout Editor of The 1851 Chronicle Camille Gillman '08, Communication 
Department Chair Janice Barrett, Donahue Institute Director Tessa LeRoux, Robert Giles, 
and President Michael Alexander. 



24 



Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Campus Update 



Report on Strategic Plan 



In his first few months as the new 
president of Lasell College, Michael 
Alexander was amused to receive the 
same question over and over again from 
any Lasell constituent whom he met, 
whether student, faculty, alumni, 
parent, staff or donor. 

"So," they would say, "What's your 
vision for the College?" 

Michael enjoyed seeing the surprise in 
the faces of his questioners when he 
consistently and resolutely responded 
that he didn't have one — yet! 

"It can't be my vision," he would 
explain. "It must be the vision of the 
whole Lasell Community." 

Michael looked forward to leading a 
collaborative and sustained effort, 
involving the whole Lasell community, 
to advance Lasell's common vision and 
to sustain its momentum for the future. 
His goal was to unite the Lasell 
constituency around two objectives: "to 
continue to strengthen Lasell's position 
and ensure its place of prominence 
among institutions of higher learning." 

In mid-September, two months into his 
presidency, Michael Alexander began 
the process of doing just that. In a 
series of town meetings representing 
each constituency of the College, and an 
intensive three-day strategic planning 
session boasting the participation of key 
representatives from each of those 
constituencies — the new president of 
Lasell facilitated the first round of a 
strategic planning process that has 
defined the College's vision of what it 
will be and what it will look like five 
years hence, in 2012. 





Where 

The Classroom 
Is The 
Real World 



I 



As part of the process, members of the 
Lasell community defined the Mission 
of the College (Lasell College integrates 
challenging coursework with practical 
experience in an environment that 
fosters lifelong intellectual exploration, 
active citizenship and social 
responsibility) and identified the 
core values of the institution: 

• Student focus 

• Innovative education across 
the lifespan 

• Integrity, honesty and ethical 
decision making 

• Social responsibility 



The picture that emerged of Lasell 
College in five years included: 

• 1,600 undergraduate students and 
300 graduate students, with 
two-thirds of all courses taught by 
full-time, permanent faculty. 

• Increased diversity on campus 
including a doubling of 
international students, a 6 percent 
increase in minority students, a 

5 percent increase in male students 
and a substantial increase in 
minorities among the faculty, staff, 
and Board of Trustees. 

• An increase in the retention of first 
year students to at least 75 percent. 

• A growth in the endowment of 
almost double to at least $40 million 
and Annual Fund giving of 

$1 million or more. 

• Four new master's degree 
programs, four service learning 
abroad programs and three new 
athletic programs. 

• Significantly expanded hours of 
critical student services, including 
health and counseling services. 

• More physical space for a growing 
student body and faculty as well as 
the additional staff to support the 
increased size and activity level. 



Additionally, the strategic plan 
anticipates: 

• Building three additional residence 
halls in the next five years — the 
College has already begun design 
and approval work on two residential 
halls, which will be located on 
Woodland Road. 

• The need to build or renovate space 
for offices and classrooms and 
expand the athletic facilities. 



*• The Lasell vision is glued together 
by the application of a consistent 
educational philosophy, applied 
across all academic programs," 
says President Alexander. "Our 
connected learning approach to 
teaching brings the real world 
right into the classroom, where 
students work closely with faculty 
in a problem-based and project- 
based approach, where students 
get to practice the work of the 
academic subject matter, 
preparing them for the day when 
they must compete for jobs, adapt 
to an ever-changing economy, 
encounter diverse peoples and 
cultures and grapple with 
ethical questions, ff 

— President Alexander 



For a closeup look at the strategic plan in detail, please go to 
www.lasell.edu/images/userlmages/fweil/Page_715/Strategic%20Plan_f1nal.pdf 



Lasell to Host First International Conference May 19-23 

Aging: Families and Households in Global Perspective 



I he RoseMary B. Fuss Center for 
Research on Aging and International 
Studies and the Donahue Institute 
for Values and Public Life are hosting 
the annual conference for the 
Committee on Family Research 
(CFR) of the International 
Sociological Association from May 
19-23. The conference is titled 
"Aging: Families and Households in 
Global Perspective." 

"We are excited to have a 
distinguished group of scholars 
coming from around the world to the 
Lasell campus," says Center Director 



Mark Sciegaj, Ph.D., who is also Dean 
of Graduate and Professional Studies. 
"Participants are coming from as far 
away as China, India, and the Middle 
East to hear our keynote speakers and to 
share their research." 

Tessa LeRoux, Ph.D., Associate 
Professor in Sociology and Director 
of the Donahue Institute, who is 
organizing the conference with Mark 
Sciegaj, has been a member of the CFR 
for many years and has presented 
papers and organized sessions for this 
conference in places as far afield as 
South Africa, Mexico, and Canada. "I 



am thrilled that we are able to put Lasell 
on the international academic map by 
having this distinguished group of 
researchers on our campus," she says. 

Conference highlights include: 

• May 19: Talk and exhibit of 
photographs of supercentenarians 
by Jerry Friedman, Chairman, 
Earth's Elders Foundation, Inc. 

• May 20: Plenary keynote address by 
Merril Silverstein, Ph.D., Professor 
of Gerontology and Sociology, Family 




and Intergerierational Relations at 
the University of South California 
Davis School of Gerontology. 

• May 21: Panel discussion with 
Dr. Irene Levin from the University 
of Oslo, Simmons Professor Sophie 
Freud, granddaughter of Sigmund, 
and Lasell Villagers Dr. Freddy 
Frankel and Dr. Margery Silver. 

For further information, please contact 
Dr. Mark Sciegaj at 617-663-7006 or 
Dr. Tessa LeRoux at 617- 243-2104. '« 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 2 1 



Campus Update 



Effects of climate Change 

Kurt Olson of Carbon Coalition 
Addresses Students 



Green is the Way to Co 

Reducing Our Carbon Footprint 



I am passionate about environmental 
issues because of my four-year-old son," 
says Kurt Olson, who is a professor at 
the Massachusetts School of Law (MSL) 
and a volunteer with the Carbon 
Coalition. "I want to say I took positive 
steps when he asks me what 1 tried to 
do when I found out tliat global 
warming would drastically affect the 
planet — and tliat means more than 
switching my light bulbs over from 
incandescent to fluorescent." 

As part of his job at MSL, Olson speaks 
about the environment. He also hosts 
cable television programs and did a 
show on the Arctic Climate Impact 
Assessment. He used some of his 




Professor Nancy Waldron and Professor 
Kurt Olson. 



findings when he spoke at Lasell at the 
request of Marketing Professor Nancy 
Waldron and her Consumer Behavior 
and Global Marketing classes. The 
students brought him to campus as 
part of their research on global warming 
and the role played by consumers 
and/or businesses. 

"Our children are going to inherit a 
completely different world than what we 
have today," he says. "In the last three 
years, 23 percent of our sea ice has 
melted and, at this rate, by 2030 the 
North Pole ice will completely 
disappear. As the ice melts, there will be 
more warming because the dark ocean 
will absorb the heat from the sun." 

Olson was careful to point out that 
climate is different from weather. "The 
trend is towards more extreme events," 
he explains. "We are seeing a 
widespread change in precipitation, heat 
waves and, with warmer oceans, there is 
a tendency for more hurricanes to form. 
Another trend is the emergence of new 
diseases. There are mosquitoes now in 
places they weren't before and they are 
moving north. 

"We need to act locally and think 
globally," he warns. "This is the biggest 
challenge to face mankind and if we 
don't take steps we are engaging in 
criminally irresponsible behavior." 'i^ 



■ here is a new energy on campus 
around the efforts to deal with climate 
change. The Green Task Force, whose 
purpose is to assess the feasibility of, 
and to recommend concrete actions 
regarding, a comprehensive Green 
Campus Campaign, has been hard at 
work looking at ways to minimize the 
Lasell carbon footprint. This initiative 
formed the impetus for a number of 
related programs sponsored by the 
Donahue Institute aimed at raising 
. awareness of this challenging issue 
on campus. 

On January 31, Lasell participated with 
more than 1000 universities, colleges, 
and schools across the country in a 
campaign called Focus the Nation. 
Faculty, students and staff responded to 
the challenge to walk, carpool or use 
public transportation. The College 
joined in a national interactive webcast 
and in a national vote to prioritize 
solutions. Many faculty members 
participated in a "teach-in," discussing 
climate change in the context of their 
subject matter. 

On February 23, Lasell was honored to 
host Lester Brown, Director of the Earth 
Policy Institute in Washington, DC. 
This event was co-sponsored by the 
Population Connection and the 
Donahue Institute. Mary Barbara 
Alexander is on the Board of the 




Lester Brown of the Earth Policy Institute 
explains his plan for action to a Hamel 
House audience. 



Population Connection, an organization 
that works closely with the Earth Policy 
Institute, and it was exciting to have a 
large number of visitors from all over 
Massachusetts join us to hear Brown's 
views on a plan for action. 

In Brown's latest book. Plan B j.o; 
Mobilizing to Save Civilization, he sets 
out the challenges facing the planet as 
well as solutions. These include cutting 
carbon emissions by 80 percent by the 
year 2020, eradicating poverty, limiting 
population growth, and planting many 
millions of trees. « 



/ 



Six Degrees of Separation 

Two Board Members Discover A Shared Past 




(L to R)Martha Franke, Herman Franke, Joan Hoffmeier, and Gertrude 
Hoffmeier stand in front of the Massey house. In front are (L to R) Jackie 
Hoffmeier and a shy Judy Hoffmeier. 



I didn't know the name of the man I 
was seated next to at the October Board 
Dinner," recalls Overseer Jackie Hoffmeier 
Lee '68, "but if I had, 1 would have 
recognized it immediately!" 

During individual introductions, the two 
asked each other where they had grown up 
and discovered that they were both from 
New Jersey. 

"What town?" asked the man. 

"Hackensack," I replied, "and I saw a look 
of increased interest cross his face." 

"What street?" he continued. 

"74 Sussex Street," I blurted out. 

"That's it, that's my grandparents' house!" 
he exclaimed. 



"I thought he must have misunderstood 
what I said, but when he told me his name 
was Dwight Massey I realized there had 
been no mistake because I remember his 
grandmother, Mrs. Massey, very well." 

Jackie's grandparents, Martha and Herman 
Franke, had rented the house from the 
Masseys for 40 years, finally purchasing it 
in 1968. Sadly, it has now been torn down. 

When Jackie returned home after the board 
meeting she went through her memorabilia 
and discovered her parents' wedding guest 
book with Dwight's grandparents' 
signatures in it as well as old photos of 74 
Sussex Street which she copied and sent 
off to the Masseys. 

"It is truly a small world," says Jackie. "I 
have such a strong recollection of Dwight's 
grandmother, the house, and the people in 
the neighborhood. For both of us it has 
been a trip down memory lane." <»' 



22 Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Campus Update 



Luminaries At Lasell 




Democratic Congressman Barney Frank speaks to President 
Michael Alexander and Mrs. Alexander before addressing 
the Lasell community on the topic of the economic effects 
of Iraq. "Without the war we would have much more 
flexibility in dealing with the recession and with the 
current health care crisis, " he said. 




Democratic Senator John Kerry visited Lasell Village 
the day before the Massachusetts primary and voiced his 
support for Barack Obama. Also speaking were (L to R) 
Democratic Congresswoman from Pennsylvania Allyson 
Schwartz, Massachusetts Democratic Congressman 
William Delahunt, and Democratic Massachusetts State 
Representative Kay Kahn. The two women spoke in 
support of Hillary Clinton. 




After the Red Sox won the series, rookie hero Jacoby Ellsbury 
spoke to a cheering crowd in de Witt Hall. Members of 
Student Government got to visit with him afterwards. 
(L to R) Director of Student Activities and Orientation C. 
Chad Argotsinger, Kristen Nobel 'lo, Maura Merullo 'lo, 
Jacoby Ellsbury, Allyson Stanczyk 'lo, Christy Cerreta '08, 
Andrew Civetti '10, and Amanda Miller 'og. 




"Spygate" and steroids are just a few of the topics on which 
Boston Globe Sports Columnist and Associate Editor Dan 
Shaughnessy has written opinion pieces. He spoke about 
ethics in the sports world to an engrossed Lasell audience 
at the invitation of the Donahue Institute and the 
Communication, Sports Management, and Athletic 
Departments. (L to R) Athletic Director Kristy Walter, 
Communication Department Chair Janice Barrett, 
Globe Columnist Dan Shaughnessy, Sport Management 
Department Chair William Nowlan, President Michael B. 
Alexander, Donahue Institute Director Tessa LeRoux, and 
Professor Marie Franklin. 



Learning New Tricks 

The Busy Life of a Lasell Graduate Certificate Student 



lo-Edith Heffron, a volunteer pet 
therapist who, along with her four 
diminutive Papillion dogs, makes over 
600 visits annually to local nursing 
homes and assisted-living facilities. 
Heffron serves as a volimteer chief 
executive officer of The Pets & People 
Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit 
organization that coordinates pet 
assisted therapy to residential health 
care facilities throughout eastern 
Massachusetts. She is also the treasurer 
for The Community Friends for Human 
Services, a volunteer organization which 
provides services to geriatrics and 
physically and mentally disabled clients 
within the Commonwealth of MA. 
Additionally, Heffron serves on the 
MSPCA Board of Overseers and the 
Newton Pride Committee. 

Oh, and her day job is chief financial 
officer at a Cambridge, MA based 
computer company. "I also have two 
grown children, three grandchildren 
and a pond fiill offish in my backyard," 
says the energetic Heffron with a laugh. 



In the past few years, amidst all this 
activity, Heffron managed to complete a 
graduate certificate in elder care 
administration at Lasell College. 

"I wanted to broaden my horizons," she 
explains. "The certificate program was 
great, because I was able to do it on a 
part-time basis. The classes are tailored 
to fit the schedule of a working 
professional or for someone who's 
returning to the classroom after a long 
hiatus. The certificate is also a great 
option because you could easily apply it 
toward a master's degree if you decided 
that you wanted to continue." 

For Heffron, however, "the certificate 
program was perfect — it was just what 
I wanted." Looking ahead, she hopes to 
turn her avocation into her vocation and 
enter the elder care field professionally. 
"Elder care is growing so rapidly. 
There's a huge need for qualified people 
to manage a growing number of 
facilities, and I have so much good 
management experience," she notes. 



Heffron reports that she also finds 
working with the elderly to be fulfilling. 
"I've grown so much through 
volunteering. It's such a good feeling 
knowing that the dogs make people's 
lives just a little better." 

Like the other day, when Heffron visited 
a Needham nursing home, "a woman 
saw me, wheeled her chair right over to 
me and started talking to the dogs," she 
recounts. "I had seen this woman before 
on previous visits, but she had never 
spoken to me. In fact, the nurses told 
me that they had never heard her speak. 
Yet on this particular day, she just 
engaged with the dogs. 'Can I come visit 
you again.'' I asked her. 'Absolutely,' she 
said. I have to admit, I had tears in my 
eyes," Heffron says. "That's what's so 
powerfiil about this work." 

At present, Heffron is enrolled in an 
innovative Volunteer Associate Chaplain 
position at Hebrew Senior Life. This 
non denominational program provides 
palliative care and will be an ongoing 



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Jo-Edith Heffron, Graduate Certificate 
Recipient 'oj, with two of her Papillion dogs. 

facet at the facility. "This year has been 
one of great learning for me and I've 
found out a lot about my own psyche." 

Heffron will continue with the program 
for another year. « 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 2 3 



isi^sm 



Campus Update 



Curator of the Nieman Foundation 
for Journalism at Harvard 

Robert Giles Speaks on Ethical 
Dilemmas Faced by the Press 



The practice of journalism today is 
built on such ethical conventions as 
accuracy, balance, fairness, and the 
pursuit of truth. When the press falls 
short, tlie public takes note," said 
Robert Giles, curator of Harvard's 
Nieman Foundation for Journalism. 
He was tlae year's first Donahue 
Institute for Values and Public Life 
speaker and his topic of media ethics 
melded perfectly with the Institute's 
focus on the moral dimensions of 
choices individuals make. His talk was 
also sponsored by Lasell's Department 
of Communication. 

The Nieman Foundation for 
JoiuTialism was founded in 1937 to 
promote and elevate the standards 
of journalism and educate persons 
deemed especially qualified for 
journalism. Each academic year, 
12 American and 12 international 
joiimalists, who are experienced 
and in mid-career, are awarded 
fellowships. Mr. Giles was himself 
a Nieman Fellow in 1966. 

Over the course of his career, two 
newspapers won Pulitzer Prizes under 
his editorship. The Beacon Journal of 
Akron, OH received the award in 1971 
for its coverage of the shootings at 
Kent State University. The Detroit News 
won in 1994 for the newspaper's 
disclosures of a scandal in the 
Michigan House Fiscal Agency. 

Mr. Giles has a deep understanding of 
the challenges facing journalism today. 
As he explained, "We live in a complex 
world. In reporting the news of the 
day, the role of a free and independent 



press is frequently in conflict with other 
values in our constitutional system of 
government such as individual privacy, 
the right to a fair trial, and matters of 
national security." 

In the 20th century an ethical standard 
for journalistic practice began to 
emerge. In the 1970s, Watergate 
made news organizations look within 
and reconsider patterns of behavior 
that included anonymous sources 
and plagiarism. 

More recently, Web sites and blogs have 
exposed instances of unethical writing. 
"Episodes of plagiarism are played out 
in all of their painful details," said Mr. 
Giles. "Unseen bloggers take words 
reporters write and Google them in the 
suspicion that they may not be original. 
And while these hurtful experiences 
mean that journalism's dirty laundry is 
being washed in public, it also means 
that news organizations are tightening 
their ethical practices." 

Another issue Mr. Giles touched on 
was, "The conflict among the press, 
the government and the courts over 
the use by journalists of leaks and 
unnamed sources." He cited instances 
where "the administration has tried to 
control the press but newspapers have 
made principled decisions to publish 
stories the White House has tried to 
keep quiet." 

Mr. Giles closed with a plea for young 
journalists "to think globally and 
function in a world dominated by 
information, science and technology, 
and the conflicts among cultures." W 




On the Sidelines at Gillette Stadium 

Lasell Freshman Makes Patriot's 
Cheering Squad 



During a huge blizzard last Saint 
Patrick's Day, Lindsey Barrows '11 
and her dance teacher met in the 
Winchendon, MA Wal-Mart parking lot 
and headed to Gillette Stadium for the 
New England Patriots cheering squad 
tryouts. "I was only going because my 
teacher didn't want to try out by 
herself," recalls Lindsey. "I'd never 
auditioned before in my life and I had 
no idea what I was in store for. I was 
scared to death. It turned out that there 
were 300 gorgeous girls trying out for 
24 spots! 

"The driving conditions were terrible 
and we arrived a bit late with knots 
in our stomachs. Fortunately the 
Patriots had extended the tryouts 
because of the storm, but even so we 
got there just in time for the group 
stretch and we were the last to try out 
in front of the judges' panel." 

The day was long and grueling. For 12 
hours Lindsey had to learn new routines 
and go through two cuts, which 
winnowed the group down to 75. Each 
of the remaining contestants then had a 
one-on-one session with the cheering 
coach. "I've never had an interview 
before," Lindsey says. "She put me at 
my ease but it seemed surreal." 

Then it was on to the day's finals. "This 
was the worst part," she exclaims. "We 
had to model in a bathing suit and high 
heels and I have never been in a 
pageant. After that we performed two at 
a time. High kicks, splits, I was doing 
them all." 

At the end of the day, the judges 
narrowed the field down to 30 and each 
finalist was presented with a rose. "I 
couldn't believe that I had made it," 
enthuses Lindsey. "I was totally shocked 
and I couldn't wait to tell my friends, 
'You guys aren't going to believe what 
just happened!'" 

For the next two weeks the 30 finalists 
had to practice at Gillette Stadium. The 
coach was watching to see how they 
picked up material and how they 
worked as a team. At the last practice 
the final cut was made and Lindsey 
discovered that she was on the team. 

"I had never left my town before and 
suddenly everything had changed," 
Lindsey says. She arrived at Lasell in 
September with a lot on her plate, but 




Patriots cheerleader and Lasell student 
Lindsey Barrows '11. 

she seems very able to manage cheering 
for the Patriots with her class work. 
She is a Communication major and 
is thinking of journalism or broadcast 
journalism as a career. 

The whirlwind of the Patriots' 18-0 
season landed Lindsey in Arizona at 
the Super Bowl. "I was there for five 
days and something incredible 
happened on each of them. For 
instance, another cheerleader and I 
were chosen to do a photo shoot for 
Maxim Online and then we were invited 
to their big party where I found myself 
walking down a red carpet. 

"At the game we were really pumped 
and because we didn't think we were 
going to lose until the final minutes it 
made it doubly hard. But, I have to keep 
reminding myself that it was an 
incredible season. I never in a million 
years thought that I'd be a Patriots 
cheerleader and what a year to start 
with the team." »•' 



(L to R) Layout Editor of The i8p Chronicle Camille Gillman '08, Communication 
Department Chair Janice Barrett, Donahue Institute Director Tessa LeRoux, Robert Giles, 
and President Michael Alexander 



2A Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Annual Fund 



Message from Michelle Walmsley: 

Director of Annual Giving 




Annual Fund Office 

1844 Commonwealth Ave. 
Newton, MA 02466-2716 
(617) 243-2165 
Fax: (617) 243-2383 

mwalmsley@laself.edu 



M ave you made a gift to the Annual 
Fund yet this year? 

We are just a few months away from the 
end of the fiscal year, and EVERY gift 
counts. One way to double or triple your 
gift, as many donors have in the past, is 
by means of a matching gift from your 
(or your spouse's) employer. Many 
companies will match gifts from their 
retirees as well. 

To learn if your company participates in 
a matching gift program, you can 
contact your company's Human 
Resources/Benefits Office or visit this 
Web site to see if your company 
participates in a matching gift program: 
www.matchinggifts.com/demo.cfm. 



Most company's paper work for this 
gift is obtainable from the Human 
Resources/Benefits Office. You fill out 
your name, address, and amount of 
your gift and send Lasell the paperwork 
— We take care of the rest! 

$50 could be $100 

$250 could be $500 

$500 could be $1,000 

Thank you for your continued support 
of the Annual Fund! 




Michelle Walmsley 1 

Director of Annual Giving 



Family, Friends 

^ & Alumni Weekend 
Save the Date! 
- October 1 8, 2008 







mtchliA/^ ucp with fne\/uis>, 
food, avuA varsity Qa\M.es> 

.'- _r. .1 r 



i225, :ioo^, oiv^d ^oo2\ 



ormorei 



Designed hy Kayla McKenna 'og 



If you are interested In supporting the Annual Fund, 

go to www.lasellalumni.org/annualfund 

or e-mail us at alumni@lasell.edu. 




Recent 
Graduate 
Supports 
Lasell 



David C. Mclnnis '03 

"Launching 
the student 
newspaper 
1857 was 
the best 
experience I 
had during 
my years at 
the College. 
It was a 
David C. Mclnnis '03 challenge that 

taught me how to get things done 
in a community and it prepared 
me for managing on 
a larger scale after graduation. 

"I was a Business Administration 
major and started my career at a 
small consulting company outside 
of Boston. I moved to New York to 
work for Adecco in support of 
JPMorgan IB Technology groups 
and I am now at Wachovia 
Corporation as an Assistant Vice 
President within Human Capital 
Management supporting Corporate 
&, Investment Banking Technology. 

I return to Lasell every year for the 
Alumni Athletic Games that are 
held in October on Family and 
Friends Weekend. Being on the 
Lasers' lacrosse and soccer teams 
was an integral part of my Lasell 
experience and this is my chance 
to reconnect. 

"My donations to the Annual 
Fund are specific to the athletic 
teams and the student-run 
newspaper and I encourage other 
alumni to give. When you support 
the College the gift gives back to 
you personally." 




Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 2 Q 



ms^si 



Major Gifts and Planned Giving 



Help Yourself Today and a Student Tomorrow with a Lasell Gift Annuity 




Lasell Gift Annuity Benefits: 



Katharine Urner-Jones '83 

Special Assistant to the 
President for Leadership 
Development 



I 



Receive attractive, secure, fixed payments for life 
Earn a significant up-front charitable tax deduction 
Help future generations of students benefit from a 



Lasell education 



For information without ohligation please contact: 

Katharine Urner-Jones '83 

Lasell College 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

(617) 243-2223 

Fax (617) 243-2383 

kumerjones@lasell.edu 

All inquires are kept strictly confidential. 



CURRENT Gin ANNUITY RATES 


One-life 




Two- Life 


f 


Age 


Rate 


Age 


Rate 


65 


6.0% 


65/65 


5.6% 


70 


6.5% 


70/70 


55.9% 


75 


7.1% 


75/75 


5.9% 


80 


8.0% 


80/80 


6.9% 


85 


9.5% 


85/85 


7.9% 


90 


n.3% 


90/90 


9-3% 


r 

Minimum gift annuity amount is $10,000. Rates subject to cinange 1 
based on gift timing. Casin or appreciated securities may fund your 
gift annuity. 



Fall Recognition Dinner 

Lasell Celebrates Its 
Leadership Donors 



Since Lasell College welcomed Michael 
B. Alexander, its ninth president in July, 
and because we were headed towards an 
election year, and since the Red Sox 
won the World Championship, it 
seemed fitting that the theme of the 
annual donor recognition dinner was 
"Celebrating LaseU Leadership." 

Almost 100 donors gathered in de Witt 
Hall on Sunday, November 4, 2007 for 
a red, white and blue celebration. 
Guests listened to remarks from various 
leaders at Lasell: Amanda Miller '09, 
President of the Student Government 
Association, and Marian Salama '08, a 
member of the Senior Class 
Committee, represented student 
leadership and talked about how gifts to 
the College have impacted and enriched 
their Lasell experience. President of 
LaseU Alumni, Inc., Urit Chaimovitz 
'98 spoke of how this event increases 
awareness among students and alumni 
about what every gift can do. Michael B. 
Alexander represented the College's 
new leadership and talked briefly about 
"Vision 2012," Lasell's newly crafted 
strategic plan. Chairman of the Board 
Erik J. Stapper thanked all of our 
leadership donors for their valuable 
support to current and future 
generations of Lasell students. 
President Alexander announced that in 
only the fourth month of this fund year. 




{L to R) Trustees RoseMary B. Fuss, Erik 
J. Stapper, and Nancy Curtis Grellier '^g. 



we had 100% participation from the 
Board of Trustees for the Annual Fund 
— another example of strong 
institutional leadership. 

Guests were also treated to a 
performance by the S.P.E.B.S.Q.S.A., 
Inc, barbershop quartet known as 
Imagination. Before dinner was served 
there were many empty seats around 
the room. Who could have predicted 
when the date was chosen for the 
dinner that the Patriots would be 
playing the only other undefeated team 
in the NFL! The Patriots were winners 
as were all who enjoyed an evening of 
appreciation and recognition for those 
who make Lasell their philanthropic 
priority each and every year. *' 



Institutional Advancement Adds 
Prospect Research Associate/Grant 
Writer to Staff 



Joanna L. McCarthy has joined the 
staff of Lasell College's Office of 
Institutional Advancement in the 
new position of Prospect Research 
Associate/Grant Writer 

Joanna comes to Lasell with strong 
experience in fundraising research 
and analysis. Most recently, she has 
been Senior Fundraising Researcher 
at Brandeis University, where her 
responsibilities have included 
fundraising research, prospecting, 
and solicitation advising. 

Prior to her role at Brandeis, Joanne 
served as Manager of Development 
Research for Bentiey College and 
before that she was Assistant Director, 
Corporate, Foundation and Government 
Relations for Babson College. 

Joanne is a candidate for a Master's 
in Business Administration degree at 
Babson College with a concentration 
in entiepreneurship. She holds an 
Associate's degree in Early Childhood 
Education from Quincy College, in 
Quincy, MA and she earned a Bachelor 
of Arts degree in Business Management 
from Curry College in Milton, MA. 




Joanna McCarthy. 

"We are delighted to welcome 
Joanna to our team of advancement 
professionals," said Institutional 
Advancement Dean Ruth Shuman. 
"It's no secret that costs for education 
are escalating precipitously. We need 
to strengthen and develop new funding 
areas to support our commitment to 
provide the best possible academic 
experience for all of our students. 

"Joanna will contribute in essential 
ways to expanding the scope and 
breath of our solicitations to currently 
untapped funding sources in the 
corporate and foundation arenas." %' 



30 



Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008 



Sports News 



Message from the Athletic Director 

Lasers Fare Well in CNAC and Lasell Looks to Expand Sports Offerings 




7S«K^' 



Office of Athletics 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 
Newton, MA 02466-2716 
(617) 243-2147 
fax (617) 243-2037 

kwalter@ lasell.edu 



■ his year was the first year of 
competition for the Lasers in the Great 
Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC). 
The fall teams fared well and were very 
competitive during this inaugural season. 
Both the men's soccer team and the 
women's volleyball team reached the 
semi-finals of their respected 
tournaments and the women's soccer 
team reached the quarterfinals. Also, both 
the men's and women's cross country 
teams placed fifth at the GNAC 
Championship meet. Lasell also saw four 
student-athletes named to the First Team 
All-Conference Teams as well as first year 
Head Coach Vito LaFrancesca being 
named GNAC Coach of the Year for 
women's soccer. Fourteen institutions are 
members of the GNAC, so qualifying for 
the tournament in the first year is a great 
accomplishment and proves that the 
Lasers are competitive. 



In the winter, the men's basketball 
team upset the number one seed, 
Emerson College, and captured the 
GNAC Championship. As the 
conference champions, the men 
advanced to the NCAA Tournament and 
faced a strong Brandeis team in the first 
round. The men played a tough first 
half, but eventually fell to the number 
six ranked Brandeis. Softball and 
women's lacrosse will compete in the 
GNAC for the first time this spring. 
Baseball will compete as a club team 
this year and will join the GNAC in 
the spring of 2009. 

In addition to joining a new conference, 
plans are currently underway to 
introduce some new teams to the 
athletic program. As an extension of 
the cross country programs, men's and 
women's indoor and outdoor track and 



field are going to be offered as club 
teams for the 2008-09 academic year 
with the anticipation of moving them 
to varsity status in 2009-10. The teams 
will plan to compete in five to eight 
indoor and outdoor meets and will 
carry rosters of 10-15 student-athletes. 
Looking ahead, the College will explore 
the possibility of adding tennis and golf 
to its offerings. There is interest from 
current students on campus and each 
of these sports is sponsored by the 
GNAC. The addition of varsity teams is 
also a part of the overall stiategic plan 
of the institution. 




Kristy Walter 
Athletic Director 



Men's Soccer 

Overall Record: 10-8 
Pilgrim League Record: 9-3 

This was the first year of competition 
for the Lasers in the Great Northeast 
Athletic Conference (GNAC). The team 
finished third in conference play and 
advanced to the semi-finals, where they 
fell to Johnson and Wales. 

Forward Zach Gagne '09 was named to 
the GNAC All-Conference First Team 
after posting 13 goals and two assists for 
the season and midfielder Brian Whelan 
'08 earned a spot on the GNAC Second 
Team, scoring three goals and a team- 
high seven assists this fall. 

Goalkeeper Julian Dutton '10 finished 
the year with 115 saves, giving him a 




Shane Vinnicombe '10 zeros in on the ball. 

spot on the GNAC All-Tournament team 
and, in October, he was named GNAC 
Goalie of the Week. Rookie defender 
Brandon Hanss was also name to the 
GNAC All-Tournament team. »»' 



Women's Soccer 

Overall Record: 11-8 
NEWLA Record: 8-6 

In his inaugural season at the helm of 
the women's soccer team, Head Coach 
Vito LaFrancesca was named the GNAC 
coach of the year. This honor is voted on 
by all GNAC coaches. 

The women scored 42 goals during the 
season and earned a spot in the 
quarterfinals of the GNAC quarterfinals, 
where they lost by a goal to Norwich 
University in a hard fought match. 

The Lasers will have their top three 
scorers returning next year: Allyson 
Bushey '11 netted a team high eight 
goals, Ashley Lambert '10 scored six and 
had four assists, and Jess Wainwright '11 



Women's Volleyball 



Overall Record: 14-17 
Conference Record: n-3 

It was a good year for the Lasers which 
culminated in the GNAC post season. 
The quarter-final match against Norwich 
University was very hard fought and 
wasrit decided until the fifth game. The 
team then advanced to the semi-finals, 
where they lost to the number one seed, 
Johnson and Wales. 

The offense for the season was led by 
Kelsey Schmidt '09 who finished with 
272 kills, followed by middle hitter 
Nicole Wetterman '09, who had 192 
kills. Senior setter Katelyn Rasich set a 




Kelsey Schmidt 'og reaches high. 

new record for career assists with 3,595. 
She was named to the GNAC All- 
Conference Third Team. W 



Men's Volleyball 

Overall Record: 13-18 
Conference Record: 4-7 

The Lasers did well in their first season 
in the GNAC, picking up their twelfth 
win in a hard fought four game match 
against Johnson and Wales University. 

Sophomore Dustin Foster lead the team 
in kills with 2.51 per game followed by 
sophomore Andy Cass '10 with 2.38. 
Defensively Joseph Lipski '09 averaged 
2.95 digs per game while setter Gary 
Gay '09 averaged 9.27. 

The Lasers competed in the GNAC 
Championship Tournament and placed 




Christina DeLuca '08 in fast motion. 

scored five goals and had three assists. 
Also returning will be Kaitlyn Fields '11 
who was named women's soccer rookie 
of the week in September. «' 




Serge Melnik '10 takes aim. 

fourth. With no seniors on the team they 
are looking forwarded to next season. W 



Spring 2008 



Lasell Leaves 3 1 



S»^P361 



noA 3|uei|x 



991720 VIM 'uovwaN 
3nu3AV Mi|e8MU0LUUJ03 t-t?8l 

J 3 1 1 o D 

1 1 a s V 1 




THANK YOU 

FOR 

SUPPORTING 

LASELL 



Lasell College Annual Fund 
1844 Commonvj/ealth Avenue 
Newton, MA 02466-2716 



My/Our gift of $_ 



to the Lasell College Annual Fi|ind is enclosed. 



Name (first, maiden, last) 
Address 



Home Telephone ( 
Employer 



City 



E-mail Address 



Class 



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Zip 



Business/Seasonal Address 



Business/Seasonal Telephone ( 
Occupation 



City 



E-mail Address 



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Zip 



Title 



D Check if recent change of address D Lasell is in my will 

Please direct toward: D Greatest Need III Student Financial Aid D Library D Athletic Programs D Academic Programs 

D Buildings and Grounds ID Anonymous Contributor Please do not publish my name in Lasell College publications. 

Matching employee gifts are greatly appreciated. 



Give through your credit card. $25 minimum on charge payments, please. 

D I authorize Lasell College to collect my gift of $__ through the credit card checked: 



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n MasterCard 



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. /extension code (BACK OF CARD IN SIGNATURE AREA) . 



PRINT NAME AS IT APPEARS ON CARD SIGNATURE 

I/We wish to support the Lasell Annual Fund this year at the following level: 

D Founder's Club ($150-$249) D Torchbearer's Club ($1,000-$2,499) D Chairman's Council ($10,000-$24,999) 

D Lasell Associates ($250-$499) D Winslow Society {$2,500-$4,999) D 1851 Society ($25,000+) 

D Bragdon /Associates ($500-$999) D President's Club ($5,000-59,999) D Please contact me about a gift of stock. 

Please make your check payable to Lasell College . Gifts are tax deductible. The Lasell College Annual Fund year ends June 30. 

617-243-2165 or www.lasellalumni.org/annualfund 



Sports News 



Men's Basketball 



Women's Basketball 



Overall Record: 20-9 
Conference Record: 14-4 

The Lasers had a great season which 
ailminated in winning the GNAC 
Conference in the team's first year of 
playing in the league and went on to the 
first round of the NCAA Tournament. 
"Winning the GNAC Conference was 
a great accomplishment." says Head 
Coach Aaron Galletta. "Our players 
stayed focused and together throughout 
the year." 

Jamie Crawford '08 and Dwayne 
Powell '08 both reached milestones in 
their senior year. Crawford reached the 
1,500 point mark and Powell broke the 
career assists record. Both players were 




The GNAC Champions! 

selected to the GNAC All-Tournament 
Team. Jose Guitan '09 had a standout 
season, scoring his 1,000th point and was 
named the GNAC Tournament MVP. « 



Overall Record: 8-17 
Conference Record: 5-8 

The women's basketball team won four 
out of their five last games in the 
regular season. New Head Coach Kelly 
Stubbs said, "I am pleased with our 
strong finished and how our team 
improved throughout the season. 
We are a young team and gained 
valuable experience." 

Senior guard Christina DeLuca finished 
her career with 672 points, 87 
rebounds, and 386 rebounds. Lauren 
Picozzi '08 ended her career with 505 
points and 398 rebounds while Shauna 
Kelly' 09 led the team in three categories 
including scoring, assists, and steals. 




Carla Zinno '11 on defense. 

Rookie guard Carla Zinno had a strong 
freshman year. 'W 



Field Hockey 

Overall Record: 8-11 
Conference Record: 5-5 

The Lasers had a good year, making it 
to the semi-finals of the North Atlantic 
Conference (NAC) after defeating 
Simmons College 4-1 in the quarterfinal 
match. They fell to the number one 
seed, University of Maine at Farmington 
in the semi-finals. 



Tia Pratt' 11 was named the NAC Rookie 
of the Year after posting a total of four 
goals and six assists. She was also 
named to the All-NAC Second Team as 
were her teammates Caitlyn Walker '10 
and Rachael Johnson '08. Walker led 
the team in scoring this season with 11 
goals and four assists. Johnson was co- 
captain with Katie Bryer '08 who also 
had a great year, scoring seven goals and 



two assists which earned her a spot on 
the NAC Honorable Mention Team. 

Senior goalkeeper Laura Gallagher had 
an outstanding season, finishing with a 
1.56 GAA, 106 saves, and setting a new 
record for minutes played in a season 
(1,164) ^^^ ^o fo^'^ overtime matches. W 




Stephanie Jansen 'og prepares to pass. 



Cross Country 



Overall Record: 8-11 
Conference Record: 5-5 

It was a very good year for both 
the men's and women's cross 
country teams. The women had 
four top ten finishes as a team 
and had strong numbers all season, 
finishing fifth overall in the 
GNAC Championship meet. 

Chantal Cyr '11 was named Women's 
GNAC Rookie of the Week in October 
when she finished eighth overall out of 
87 runners in the Emmanuel 
Invitational. Kayla McKenna '09 
finished seventh in the GNAC 
Championship meet, earning her a spot 
on the GNAC All-Conference team. She 
also ran a personal best at the NCAA 
regional meet where she finished with 
24:47 in the 6K race. The women 
finished fifth overall in the GNAC 
Championship meet. 

The men also finished fifth in the 
GNAC Championship in a very close 
match with just eight points separating 
teams three through five. Seventy-four 





Andrew Gundlach '08. 



runners competed, with Lasell having 
three in the top 20. 

Chris Johnson '09 was named the 
GNAC Runner of the Week in 
September after placing first in the 
New England College Pilgrim Pride 





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Number ^j^ Stephanie Hauck '10 and 
number ^ij Michelle Acosta 'og. 

Invitational. The team will lose two 
seniors, Andrew Gundlach and Kevin 
Lawson, both of whom have been 
major contributors throughout their 
four year careers. ♦• 



^, 



Spring 2008 

Lasell l£AVES is distributed twice 
a year, free of charge to alumni, 
students, and friends of Lasell. 

The publication is produced by 

The Office of Institutional Advancement 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 
Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Dean for Institutional Advancement 

Ruth S. Shuman 

Managing Editor 

Fran Weil 

Editor 

Phyllis Taylor 

Photography 

David Carlson 
Phyllis Taylor 
Stewart Woodward 

Director of Support Services 

Jeanne A. [ohnsen '72 

Design 

Kenneally Creative 

Printing 

Kirkwood Printing Company 

© 200S, lasdX College. All RigJits Reserved. 



32 



Lasell Leaves 



Spring 2008